Fascism studies (and the 'Post-Fascist' era): an ideal meeting ground?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/217390
Title:
Fascism studies (and the 'Post-Fascist' era): an ideal meeting ground?
Authors:
Copsey, N. (Nigel)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. School of Arts and Media
Citation:
Copsey, N. (2012) ‘Fascism studies (and the ‘Post-Fascist’ era): an ideal meeting ground?’, Fascism, 1, pp.19-20.
Publisher:
Brill
Journal:
Fascism: Journal of Comparative Fascist Studies
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/217390
DOI:
10.1163/221162512X623593
Additional Links:
http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/10.1163/221162512x623593
Abstract:
As a historian of fascism's recent manifestations, I am acutely aware of the continuing and rather unfortunate division between historians and political scientists that still obtains in the field of fascism studies. "Most political scientists", as Roger Eatwell put it some time ago, "use the term 'fascism' in the contemporary context within a rigid inter-war template" (Eatwell 2004 , 6). Despite the laudable attempt of Roger Griffin and others to draw attention to fascism's inherent protean quality, little has changed in the intervening period. Indeed, when it comes to the contemporary extreme right, few political scientists would even recognise the relevance of 'fascism studies' to their concerns, preferring to deploy neologisms such as 'radical right-wing populism' instead. Their field is not 'fascism studies' but 'radical right-wing populism' studies, a field that is concerned with the plethora of party-political organisations of authoritarian, nativist and populist type that have become increasingly embedded within Europe's contemporary political landscape.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
fascism; Great Britain; extreme right; politics; history; Europe
ISSN:
2211-6249; 2211-6257
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 03/04/2012]
Citation Count:
No citation information available on Web of Science or Scopus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCopsey, N. (Nigel)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-03T09:34:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-03T09:34:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationFascism; 1(0):19-20en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2211-6249-
dc.identifier.issn2211-6257-
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/221162512X623593-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/217390-
dc.description.abstractAs a historian of fascism's recent manifestations, I am acutely aware of the continuing and rather unfortunate division between historians and political scientists that still obtains in the field of fascism studies. "Most political scientists", as Roger Eatwell put it some time ago, "use the term 'fascism' in the contemporary context within a rigid inter-war template" (Eatwell 2004 , 6). Despite the laudable attempt of Roger Griffin and others to draw attention to fascism's inherent protean quality, little has changed in the intervening period. Indeed, when it comes to the contemporary extreme right, few political scientists would even recognise the relevance of 'fascism studies' to their concerns, preferring to deploy neologisms such as 'radical right-wing populism' instead. Their field is not 'fascism studies' but 'radical right-wing populism' studies, a field that is concerned with the plethora of party-political organisations of authoritarian, nativist and populist type that have become increasingly embedded within Europe's contemporary political landscape.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBrillen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/10.1163/221162512x623593en_GB
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 03/04/2012]en_GB
dc.subjectfascismen_GB
dc.subjectGreat Britainen_GB
dc.subjectextreme righten_GB
dc.subjectpoliticsen_GB
dc.subjecthistoryen_GB
dc.subjectEuropeen_GB
dc.titleFascism studies (and the 'Post-Fascist' era): an ideal meeting ground?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. School of Arts and Mediaen_GB
dc.identifier.journalFascism: Journal of Comparative Fascist Studiesen_GB
ref.citationcountNo citation information available on Web of Science or Scopusen_GB
or.citation.harvardCopsey, N. (2012) ‘Fascism studies (and the ‘Post-Fascist’ era): an ideal meeting ground?’, Fascism, 1, pp.19-20.en_GB
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