Exercises for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/249111
Title:
Exercises for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis
Authors:
Romano, M. (Michele); Minozzi, S. (Silvia); Bettany-Saltikov, J. A. (Josette); Zaina, F. (Fabio); Chockalingam, N. (Nachiappan); Kotwicki, T. (Tomasz); Maier-Hennes, A. (Axel); Negrini, S. (Stefano)
Affiliation:
ISICO (Italian Scientific Spine Institute), Milan, Italy.
Citation:
Romano, M., Minozzi, S., Bettany-Saltikov, J., Zaina, F., Chockalingam, N., Kotwicki, T., Maier- Hennes, A., and Negrini, S. (2012) 'Exercises for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis', Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews, 8, Art. No. CD007837.
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Journal:
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)
Issue Date:
15-Aug-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/249111
DOI:
10.1002/14651858.CD007837.pub2
PubMed ID:
22895967
Abstract:
Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a three-dimensional deformity of the spine . While AIS can progress during growth and cause a surface deformity, it is usually not symptomatic. However, in adulthood, if the final spinal curvature surpasses a certain critical threshold, the risk of health problems and curve progression is increased. The use of scoliosis-specific exercises (SSE) to reduce progression of AIS and postpone or avoid other more invasive treatments is controversial.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
adolescent; disease progression; electric stimulation therapy; exercise therapy; physical therapy modalities; posture; scoliosis; Traction
ISSN:
1469-493X
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/10/2012]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 17/10/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRomano, M. (Michele)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMinozzi, S. (Silvia)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBettany-Saltikov, J. A. (Josette)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZaina, F. (Fabio)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorChockalingam, N. (Nachiappan)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKotwicki, T. (Tomasz)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaier-Hennes, A. (Axel)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNegrini, S. (Stefano)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-17T10:09:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-17T10:09:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-15-
dc.identifier.citationCochrane Database Systematic Reviews;8 : CD007837en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1469-493X-
dc.identifier.pmid22895967-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/14651858.CD007837.pub2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/249111-
dc.description.abstractAdolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a three-dimensional deformity of the spine . While AIS can progress during growth and cause a surface deformity, it is usually not symptomatic. However, in adulthood, if the final spinal curvature surpasses a certain critical threshold, the risk of health problems and curve progression is increased. The use of scoliosis-specific exercises (SSE) to reduce progression of AIS and postpone or avoid other more invasive treatments is controversial.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_GB
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/10/2012]en_GB
dc.subjectadolescenten_GB
dc.subjectdisease progressionen_GB
dc.subjectelectric stimulation therapyen_GB
dc.subjectexercise therapyen_GB
dc.subjectphysical therapy modalitiesen_GB
dc.subjectpostureen_GB
dc.subjectscoliosisen_GB
dc.subjectTractionen_GB
dc.titleExercises for adolescent idiopathic scoliosisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentISICO (Italian Scientific Spine Institute), Milan, Italy.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)en_GB
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 17/10/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardRomano, M., Minozzi, S., Bettany-Saltikov, J., Zaina, F., Chockalingam, N., Kotwicki, T., Maier- Hennes, A., and Negrini, S. (2012) 'Exercises for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis', Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews, 8, Art. No. CD007837.en_GB

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