The twenty-first century multiple generation workforce: overlaps and differences but also challenges and benefits

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/249131
Title:
The twenty-first century multiple generation workforce: overlaps and differences but also challenges and benefits
Authors:
Helyer, R. (Ruth); Lee, D. (Dionne)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Department of Academic Enterprise.
Citation:
Helyer, R. and Lee, D. (2012) 'The twenty-first century multiple generation workforce: overlaps and differences but also challenges and benefits', Education and Training, 54 (7), pp.545-578.
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Journal:
Education and Training
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/249131
DOI:
10.1108/00400911211265611
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues around a multiple generational workforce and more specifically, the challenges and benefits for education providers and employers. Design/methodology/approach: Reviewing research papers, analysing academic texts, interrogating market intelligence and contextualising case studies, the paper examines the "experience" or "qualifications" debate alongside the similarities, differences and overlaps of the cross-generational workforce, with a view to offering education/training solutions. Findings: Demographic forecasts suggest that the UK workplace will imminently be dominated by older, experienced employees. As the composition of the workplace shifts, examining the inter-relationship between groups of workers of different ages/profiles who have different skills, attitudes, expectations and learning styles is vital. The synergy caused by this inter-mingling cannot help but impact on employers, sectors and higher education institutions. Research limitations/implications: Data around the "older" graduate is not readily available - there is still an implicit belief that "graduate" means approximately 21/22 years old. Whilst many general demographic forecasts are produced, the future is still relatively unknown. Originality/value: The paper builds upon the authors' own original research into the employment market from an HE perspective. Little has been so far published around how the generations might usefully work together, especially the idea of adapting the skills and maximising on the overlaps of different generational profiles. The exploration of the hybrid graduate is also a new area for academic research.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Baby Boomer generation; cross-generational; demographics; employees; experience; higher education; multi-generational workforce; older workers; United Kingdom; young workers
ISSN:
0040-0912
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/10/2012]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 17/10/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHelyer, R. (Ruth)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, D. (Dionne)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-17T12:39:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-17T12:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-
dc.identifier.citationEducation and Training; 54 (7): 545-578en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0040-0912-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/00400911211265611-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/249131-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to explore the issues around a multiple generational workforce and more specifically, the challenges and benefits for education providers and employers. Design/methodology/approach: Reviewing research papers, analysing academic texts, interrogating market intelligence and contextualising case studies, the paper examines the "experience" or "qualifications" debate alongside the similarities, differences and overlaps of the cross-generational workforce, with a view to offering education/training solutions. Findings: Demographic forecasts suggest that the UK workplace will imminently be dominated by older, experienced employees. As the composition of the workplace shifts, examining the inter-relationship between groups of workers of different ages/profiles who have different skills, attitudes, expectations and learning styles is vital. The synergy caused by this inter-mingling cannot help but impact on employers, sectors and higher education institutions. Research limitations/implications: Data around the "older" graduate is not readily available - there is still an implicit belief that "graduate" means approximately 21/22 years old. Whilst many general demographic forecasts are produced, the future is still relatively unknown. Originality/value: The paper builds upon the authors' own original research into the employment market from an HE perspective. Little has been so far published around how the generations might usefully work together, especially the idea of adapting the skills and maximising on the overlaps of different generational profiles. The exploration of the hybrid graduate is also a new area for academic research.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden_GB
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/10/2012]en_GB
dc.subjectBaby Boomer generationen_GB
dc.subjectcross-generationalen_GB
dc.subjectdemographicsen_GB
dc.subjectemployeesen_GB
dc.subjectexperienceen_GB
dc.subjecthigher educationen_GB
dc.subjectmulti-generational workforceen_GB
dc.subjectolder workersen_GB
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen_GB
dc.subjectyoung workersen_GB
dc.titleThe twenty-first century multiple generation workforce: overlaps and differences but also challenges and benefitsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Department of Academic Enterprise.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEducation and Trainingen_GB
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 17/10/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardHelyer, R. and Lee, D. (2012) 'The twenty-first century multiple generation workforce: overlaps and differences but also challenges and benefits', Education and Training, 54 (7), pp.545-578.en_GB
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