Identifying factors to improve oral cancer screening uptake: a qualitative study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/253421
Title:
Identifying factors to improve oral cancer screening uptake: a qualitative study
Authors:
Zohoori, F. V. (Fatemeh Vida); Shah, K. (Kamini); Mason, J. (Julie); Shucksmith, J. S. (Janet)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Zohoori, F., Shah, K., Mason, J., and Shucksmith, J. (2012) 'Identifying Factors to Improve Oral Cancer Screening Uptake: A Qualitative Study', PLoS ONE, 7(10): e47410
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/253421
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0047410
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047410
Abstract:
Aims To engage with high risk groups to identify knowledge and awareness of oral cancer signs and symptoms and the factors likely to contribute to improved screening uptake. Methods Focus group discussions were undertaken with 18 males; 40+ years of age; smokers and/or drinkers (15+ cigarettes per day and/or 15+ units of alcohol per week), irregular dental attenders living in economically deprived areas of Teesside. Results There was a striking reported lack of knowledge and awareness of oral cancer and its signs and symptoms among the participants. When oral/mouth cancer leaflets produced by Cancer Research UK were presented to the participants, they claimed that they would seek help on noticing such a condition. There was a preference to seek help from their general practitioner rather than their dentist due to perceptions that a dentist is ‘inaccessible’ on a physical and psychological level, costly, a ‘tooth specialist’ not a ‘mouth specialist’, and also not able to prescribe medication and make referrals to specialists. Interestingly, none of the 18 participants who were offered a free oral cancer examination at a dental practice took up this offer. Conclusions The uptake of oral cancer screening may be improved by increasing knowledge of the existence and signs and symptoms of oral cancer. Other factors that may increase uptake are increased awareness of the role of dentists in diagnosing oral cancer, promotion of oral cancer screening by health professionals during routine health checks, and the use of a “health” screening setting as opposed to a “dental” setting for such checks.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
oral cancer; symptoms; awareness; Teesside
ISSN:
1932-6203
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 27/11/2012].
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 27/11/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZohoori, F. V. (Fatemeh Vida)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorShah, K. (Kamini)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMason, J. (Julie)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorShucksmith, J. S. (Janet)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T12:00:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-27T12:00:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-10-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 7 (10): e47410en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0047410-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/253421-
dc.description.abstractAims To engage with high risk groups to identify knowledge and awareness of oral cancer signs and symptoms and the factors likely to contribute to improved screening uptake. Methods Focus group discussions were undertaken with 18 males; 40+ years of age; smokers and/or drinkers (15+ cigarettes per day and/or 15+ units of alcohol per week), irregular dental attenders living in economically deprived areas of Teesside. Results There was a striking reported lack of knowledge and awareness of oral cancer and its signs and symptoms among the participants. When oral/mouth cancer leaflets produced by Cancer Research UK were presented to the participants, they claimed that they would seek help on noticing such a condition. There was a preference to seek help from their general practitioner rather than their dentist due to perceptions that a dentist is ‘inaccessible’ on a physical and psychological level, costly, a ‘tooth specialist’ not a ‘mouth specialist’, and also not able to prescribe medication and make referrals to specialists. Interestingly, none of the 18 participants who were offered a free oral cancer examination at a dental practice took up this offer. Conclusions The uptake of oral cancer screening may be improved by increasing knowledge of the existence and signs and symptoms of oral cancer. Other factors that may increase uptake are increased awareness of the role of dentists in diagnosing oral cancer, promotion of oral cancer screening by health professionals during routine health checks, and the use of a “health” screening setting as opposed to a “dental” setting for such checks.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047410en_GB
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 27/11/2012].en_GB
dc.subjectoral canceren_GB
dc.subjectsymptomsen_GB
dc.subjectawarenessen_GB
dc.subjectTeessideen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying factors to improve oral cancer screening uptake: a qualitative studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen_GB
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 27/11/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardZohoori, F., Shah, K., Mason, J., and Shucksmith, J. (2012) 'Identifying Factors to Improve Oral Cancer Screening Uptake: A Qualitative Study', PLoS ONE, 7(10): e47410en_GB
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