Factors important in the design of information material for scoliosis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/48909
Title:
Factors important in the design of information material for scoliosis
Authors:
van Schaik, P. (Paul) ( 0000-0001-5322-6554 ) ; Flynn, D. (Darren); van Wersch, A. (Anna); Ryan, K.-A. (Kelly-Ann); Ferguson, V. (Victoria)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law. Psychology Subject Group.
Citation:
van Schaik, P. et al. (2007) ‘Factors important in the design of information material for scoliosis’, International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 30 (2), pp.163-165.
Publisher:
Chapman and Hall
Journal:
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research
Issue Date:
Jun-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/48909
DOI:
10.1097/MRR.0b013e32813a2ec6
PubMed ID:
17473629
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to identify the most salient characteristics for designing written information for persons with idiopathic scoliosis and their families. A sample of 106 persons with idiopathic scoliosis (n=83) and family members of persons with idiopathic scoliosis (n=23) completed a postal questionnaire to assess perceived level of scoliosis-related knowledge, importance attached to generic design characteristics of information material and preferences for presentation of risk information. Scoliosis knowledge was rated below average for 70% of topics. The most important generic design characteristics were associated primarily with treatment for scoliosis. A majority desired information on benefits/risks of treatment in both absolute and relative terms, and both loss and gain information. Relative frequencies, percentages without decimals, bar graphs, pie charts and Paling Palette were rated as clearest for the presentation of risk information. Respondents lacked knowledge about their condition, which warrants an assessment of current information needs before, during and after treatment, and generic preferences for information and its presentation were identified. Ideally, information material should cover all treatment options including outcome probabilities using frequencies per 100 people and without decimals. Practitioners are best placed to refer persons with idiopathic scoliosis to 'approved' sources of information on the Internet or self-help groups.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
adolescent; adult; aged; awareness; family; female; health education; humans; male; male; questionnaires; risk; scoliosis
ISSN:
0342-5282
Rights:
No publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 29/10/2009]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 29/10/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorvan Schaik, P. (Paul)-
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, D. (Darren)-
dc.contributor.authorvan Wersch, A. (Anna)-
dc.contributor.authorRyan, K.-A. (Kelly-Ann)-
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, V. (Victoria)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-11T14:23:12Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-11T14:23:12Z-
dc.date.issued2007-06-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research; 30 (2): 163-165en
dc.identifier.issn0342-5282-
dc.identifier.pmid17473629-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MRR.0b013e32813a2ec6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/48909-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to identify the most salient characteristics for designing written information for persons with idiopathic scoliosis and their families. A sample of 106 persons with idiopathic scoliosis (n=83) and family members of persons with idiopathic scoliosis (n=23) completed a postal questionnaire to assess perceived level of scoliosis-related knowledge, importance attached to generic design characteristics of information material and preferences for presentation of risk information. Scoliosis knowledge was rated below average for 70% of topics. The most important generic design characteristics were associated primarily with treatment for scoliosis. A majority desired information on benefits/risks of treatment in both absolute and relative terms, and both loss and gain information. Relative frequencies, percentages without decimals, bar graphs, pie charts and Paling Palette were rated as clearest for the presentation of risk information. Respondents lacked knowledge about their condition, which warrants an assessment of current information needs before, during and after treatment, and generic preferences for information and its presentation were identified. Ideally, information material should cover all treatment options including outcome probabilities using frequencies per 100 people and without decimals. Practitioners are best placed to refer persons with idiopathic scoliosis to 'approved' sources of information on the Internet or self-help groups.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherChapman and Hallen
dc.rightsNo publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 29/10/2009]-
dc.subjectadolescent-
dc.subjectadult-
dc.subjectaged-
dc.subjectawareness-
dc.subjectfamily-
dc.subjectfemale-
dc.subjecthealth education-
dc.subjecthumans-
dc.subjectmale-
dc.subjectmale-
dc.subjectquestionnaires-
dc.subjectrisk-
dc.subjectscoliosis-
dc.titleFactors important in the design of information material for scoliosisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law. Psychology Subject Group.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 29/10/2009]-
or.citation.harvardvan Schaik, P. et al. (2007) ‘Factors important in the design of information material for scoliosis’, International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 30 (2), pp.163-165.-

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