Multidisciplinary compliance with guidelines for stroke assessment: results of a nurse-led evaluation study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58204
Title:
Multidisciplinary compliance with guidelines for stroke assessment: results of a nurse-led evaluation study
Authors:
Hamilton, S. (Sharon); McLaren, S. (Susan); Mulhall, A. (Anne)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Institute of Health and Social Care Research; London South Bank University. Faculty of Health and Social Care. Centre for Leadership and Practice Innovation; Independent research consultant. Norfolk.
Citation:
Hamilton, S., McLaren, S. and Mulhall, A. (2006) 'Multidisciplinary compliance with guidelines for stroke assessment: results of a nurse-led evaluation study', Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing, 9 (suppl. 1), pp.e57-e67.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58204
DOI:
10.1016/j.cein.2006.10.007
Abstract:
Objectives: To evaluate the use of a combined strategy (a nurse opinion-leader; evidence-based guidelines; a staff education programme and a new recording system) for the implementation of multidisciplinary stroke assessment in an acute hospital setting as measured by the compliance of different professional groups. Design: A quasi-experimental study design utilising a pre-test/post-test group. Setting: Nine medical wards in a 600 bedded outer London Acute NHS Trust (without a stroke unit). Participants: 190 stroke patients (n = 98 pre-test vs n = 92 post-test). Main outcome measures: Professional compliance with assessment guidelines documented in the new recording system. Results: Pre-test compliance with guidelines (n40) ranged from 0% to 100% and post-test ranged from 23–100%. Significant improvements (p < .05) in compliance were found in relation to 25 guidelines and a significant decline was documented in four others. Comparison of pre vs post-test values demonstrated variable changes in compliance with guidelines across professional groups: medical (range −64–+23%); nursing (range +2–+74%); physiotherapy (range −15–+69%); occupational therapy (range 0–+34%). Conclusion: The combined use of an opinion leader, guidelines, education and a recording system had a variable affect on compliance with guidelines; opinion-leadership appeared to have the most influence over compliance. The study design, and guideline specific features may have constrained changes in practice.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
stroke; assessment; guidelines
ISSN:
1361-9004
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 15/01/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, S. (Sharon)-
dc.contributor.authorMcLaren, S. (Susan)-
dc.contributor.authorMulhall, A. (Anne)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:45:53Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:45:53Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Effectiveness in Nursing; 9 (suppl. 1): e57-e67-
dc.identifier.issn1361-9004-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cein.2006.10.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58204-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate the use of a combined strategy (a nurse opinion-leader; evidence-based guidelines; a staff education programme and a new recording system) for the implementation of multidisciplinary stroke assessment in an acute hospital setting as measured by the compliance of different professional groups. Design: A quasi-experimental study design utilising a pre-test/post-test group. Setting: Nine medical wards in a 600 bedded outer London Acute NHS Trust (without a stroke unit). Participants: 190 stroke patients (n = 98 pre-test vs n = 92 post-test). Main outcome measures: Professional compliance with assessment guidelines documented in the new recording system. Results: Pre-test compliance with guidelines (n40) ranged from 0% to 100% and post-test ranged from 23–100%. Significant improvements (p < .05) in compliance were found in relation to 25 guidelines and a significant decline was documented in four others. Comparison of pre vs post-test values demonstrated variable changes in compliance with guidelines across professional groups: medical (range −64–+23%); nursing (range +2–+74%); physiotherapy (range −15–+69%); occupational therapy (range 0–+34%). Conclusion: The combined use of an opinion leader, guidelines, education and a recording system had a variable affect on compliance with guidelines; opinion-leadership appeared to have the most influence over compliance. The study design, and guideline specific features may have constrained changes in practice.-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 15/01/2010]-
dc.subjectstroke-
dc.subjectassessment-
dc.subjectguidelines-
dc.titleMultidisciplinary compliance with guidelines for stroke assessment: results of a nurse-led evaluation study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Institute of Health and Social Care Research; London South Bank University. Faculty of Health and Social Care. Centre for Leadership and Practice Innovation; Independent research consultant. Norfolk.-
dc.identifier.journalClinical Effectiveness in Nursing-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardHamilton, S., McLaren, S. and Mulhall, A. (2006) 'Multidisciplinary compliance with guidelines for stroke assessment: results of a nurse-led evaluation study', Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing, 9 (suppl. 1), pp.e57-e67.-
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