Use of surgery to aid weight reduction - experience of two regions of Northern England: a database study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58207
Title:
Use of surgery to aid weight reduction - experience of two regions of Northern England: a database study
Authors:
Wilkinson, J. R. (John); Summerbell, C. D. (Carolyn); Macknight, N. (Neil); Bailey, K. E.; Chappel, D. B. (David)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside; University of Durham. Queen's Campus. School for Health. North East Public Health Observatory.
Citation:
Wilkinson, J. R. et al. (2005) 'Use of surgery to aid weight reduction - experience of two regions of Northern England: a database study', International Journal of Obesity, 29 (2), pp.204 - 207.
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
International Journal of Obesity
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58207
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0802833
Abstract:
Objective: To determine the usage of surgery in the management of obesity. Design: Analysis of routine statistics. Data sources: Hospital Episode Statistics extract held by Public Health Observatories. Geographical areas: Two Government Office Regions in England with a population of 7.6 million. Time period: Data analysed in the study covered the 6 y 1996/1997–2001/2002. Results: The availability and uptake of surgery for obesity in the two regions was hugely variable. The overall utilisation of the procedures examined (OPCS operation codes: G30.1, G30.2, G32.10, G61.00) was 5.6 per million per annum, but ranged by Primary Care Trust from zero (the case in eight of the 50 PCTs in the two regions) to 24.0 operations per million per year. The rates of access to this surgery differed over six-fold between the two regions (1.4 operations per year per million population to 7.9 operations per year per million population). The PCTs with the highest rates of surgery, were those closest to the large providers of service. Conclusions: Access to this intervention is highly variable. Primary Care Trusts in England and service providers need to ensure that there is appropriate access to this effective procedure in carefully selected cases. The surgical expertise required for these operations could be concentrated in fewer centres.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
obesity surgery; morbid obesity; hospital data; weight reduction; Northern England
ISSN:
0307-0565
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 04/01/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 04/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, J. R. (John)-
dc.contributor.authorSummerbell, C. D. (Carolyn)-
dc.contributor.authorMacknight, N. (Neil)-
dc.contributor.authorBailey, K. E.-
dc.contributor.authorChappel, D. B. (David)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:45:58Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:45:58Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Obesity; 29 (2): 204 - 207-
dc.identifier.issn0307-0565-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.ijo.0802833-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58207-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine the usage of surgery in the management of obesity. Design: Analysis of routine statistics. Data sources: Hospital Episode Statistics extract held by Public Health Observatories. Geographical areas: Two Government Office Regions in England with a population of 7.6 million. Time period: Data analysed in the study covered the 6 y 1996/1997–2001/2002. Results: The availability and uptake of surgery for obesity in the two regions was hugely variable. The overall utilisation of the procedures examined (OPCS operation codes: G30.1, G30.2, G32.10, G61.00) was 5.6 per million per annum, but ranged by Primary Care Trust from zero (the case in eight of the 50 PCTs in the two regions) to 24.0 operations per million per year. The rates of access to this surgery differed over six-fold between the two regions (1.4 operations per year per million population to 7.9 operations per year per million population). The PCTs with the highest rates of surgery, were those closest to the large providers of service. Conclusions: Access to this intervention is highly variable. Primary Care Trusts in England and service providers need to ensure that there is appropriate access to this effective procedure in carefully selected cases. The surgical expertise required for these operations could be concentrated in fewer centres.-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 04/01/2010]-
dc.subjectobesity surgery-
dc.subjectmorbid obesity-
dc.subjecthospital data-
dc.subjectweight reduction-
dc.subjectNorthern England-
dc.titleUse of surgery to aid weight reduction - experience of two regions of Northern England: a database study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside; University of Durham. Queen's Campus. School for Health. North East Public Health Observatory.-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Obesity-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 04/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardWilkinson, J. R. et al. (2005) 'Use of surgery to aid weight reduction - experience of two regions of Northern England: a database study', International Journal of Obesity, 29 (2), pp.204 - 207.-
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