Improving management of obesity in primary care: cluster randomised trial

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58211
Title:
Improving management of obesity in primary care: cluster randomised trial
Authors:
Moore, H. J. (Helen); Summerbell, C. D. (Carolyn); Greenwood, D. C. (Darren); Tovey, P. (Philip); Griffiths, J. (Jacqui); Henderson, M. (Maureen); Hesketh, K. (Kate); Woolgar, S. (Sally); Adamson, A. J. (Ashley)
Affiliation:
University of Leeds. Centre for Research in Primary Care; University of Teesside. School of Health; University of Leeds. Biostatistics Unit; University of Leeds. School of Healthcare Studies; St Mary's Hospital. Leeds Community Nutrition. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics; University Hospital of North Durham. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics; Royal Victoria Infirmary. Newcastle Hospitals NHS Trust. Newcastle Nutrition; Scarborough Hospital. Whitby and Ryedale Primary Care Trust. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics; University of Newcastle upon Tyne. School of Clinical Medical Sciences. Human Nutrition Research Centre.
Citation:
Moore, H. J. et al. (2003) 'Improving management of obesity in primary care: cluster randomised trial', BMJ, 327 (7423), pp.1085-1088.
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Journal:
BMJ
Issue Date:
8-Nov-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58211
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.327.7423.1085
Abstract:
Objective: To evaluate a training programme intended to improve the management of obesity, delivered to general practice teams. Design: Cluster randomised trial. Setting: Northern and Yorkshire region of England Participants: 44 general practices invited consecutively attending obese adults to participate; 843 patients attended for collection of baseline data and were subsequently randomised. Intervention: 4.5 hour training programme promoting an obesity management model. Main outcome measures: Difference in weight between patients in intervention and control groups at 12 months (main outcome measure) and at 3 months and 18 months; change in practitioners' knowledge and behaviour in obesity management consultations. Results: Twelve months after training the patients in the intervention group were 1 (95% confidence interval - 1.9 to 3.9) kg heavier than controls (P = 0.5). Some evidence indicated that practitioners' knowledge had improved. Some aspects of the management model, including recording weight, target weight, and dietary targets, occurred more frequently in intervention practices after the training, but in absolute terms levels of implementation were low. Conclusion: A training package promoting a brief, prescriptive approach to the treatment of obesity through lifestyle modification, intended to be incorporated into routine clinical practice, did not ultimately affect the weight of this motivated and at risk cohort of patients.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
training programme; obesity; management; North England; Yorkshire; adults; primary care
ISSN:
1468-5833
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 13/01/2010]
Citation Count:
37 [Scopus,13/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMoore, H. J. (Helen)-
dc.contributor.authorSummerbell, C. D. (Carolyn)-
dc.contributor.authorGreenwood, D. C. (Darren)-
dc.contributor.authorTovey, P. (Philip)-
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, J. (Jacqui)-
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, M. (Maureen)-
dc.contributor.authorHesketh, K. (Kate)-
dc.contributor.authorWoolgar, S. (Sally)-
dc.contributor.authorAdamson, A. J. (Ashley)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:46:04Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:46:04Z-
dc.date.issued2003-11-08-
dc.identifier.citationBMJ; 327 (7423): 1085-1088-
dc.identifier.issn1468-5833-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.327.7423.1085-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58211-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate a training programme intended to improve the management of obesity, delivered to general practice teams. Design: Cluster randomised trial. Setting: Northern and Yorkshire region of England Participants: 44 general practices invited consecutively attending obese adults to participate; 843 patients attended for collection of baseline data and were subsequently randomised. Intervention: 4.5 hour training programme promoting an obesity management model. Main outcome measures: Difference in weight between patients in intervention and control groups at 12 months (main outcome measure) and at 3 months and 18 months; change in practitioners' knowledge and behaviour in obesity management consultations. Results: Twelve months after training the patients in the intervention group were 1 (95% confidence interval - 1.9 to 3.9) kg heavier than controls (P = 0.5). Some evidence indicated that practitioners' knowledge had improved. Some aspects of the management model, including recording weight, target weight, and dietary targets, occurred more frequently in intervention practices after the training, but in absolute terms levels of implementation were low. Conclusion: A training package promoting a brief, prescriptive approach to the treatment of obesity through lifestyle modification, intended to be incorporated into routine clinical practice, did not ultimately affect the weight of this motivated and at risk cohort of patients.-
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 13/01/2010]-
dc.subjecttraining programme-
dc.subjectobesity-
dc.subjectmanagement-
dc.subjectNorth England-
dc.subjectYorkshire-
dc.subjectadults-
dc.subjectprimary care-
dc.titleImproving management of obesity in primary care: cluster randomised trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Leeds. Centre for Research in Primary Care; University of Teesside. School of Health; University of Leeds. Biostatistics Unit; University of Leeds. School of Healthcare Studies; St Mary's Hospital. Leeds Community Nutrition. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics; University Hospital of North Durham. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics; Royal Victoria Infirmary. Newcastle Hospitals NHS Trust. Newcastle Nutrition; Scarborough Hospital. Whitby and Ryedale Primary Care Trust. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics; University of Newcastle upon Tyne. School of Clinical Medical Sciences. Human Nutrition Research Centre.-
dc.identifier.journalBMJ-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount37 [Scopus,13/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardMoore, H. J. et al. (2003) 'Improving management of obesity in primary care: cluster randomised trial', BMJ, 327 (7423), pp.1085-1088.-
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