Auditory cues can modify the gait of persons with early stage Parkinson's disease: a method for enhancing parkinsonian walking performance?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58227
Title:
Auditory cues can modify the gait of persons with early stage Parkinson's disease: a method for enhancing parkinsonian walking performance?
Authors:
Howe, T. E. (Tracey); Lövgreen, B. (Brenda); Cody, F. W. J. (Frederick); Ashton, V. J. (Vicki); Oldham, J. A. (Jacqueline); Whittaker, V. J. (Victoria)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Postgraduate Institute. Rehabilitation Research Unit; Manchester Royal Infirmary. Manchester School of Physiotherapy; University of Manchester. School of Biological Sciences.
Citation:
Howe, T. E. et al. (2003) 'Auditory cues can modify the gait of persons with early stage Parkinson's disease: a method for enhancing parkinsonian walking performance?', Clinical Rehabilitation, 17(4) pp.363-367.
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
Clinical Rehabilitation
Issue Date:
Jul-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58227
DOI:
10.1191/0269215503cr621oa
Abstract:
Objective: To investigate whether systematically adjusting the rate of auditory cues induces corresponding modulations of the temporal and spatial parameters of gait of patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease. Design: Subjects performed a series of 15 9-metre walks along a level floor under uncued and four cued conditions; the order of cued conditions was randomized. Setting: A physiotherapy gymnasium, Manchester, UK. Subjects: Eleven subjects with early-stage idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Interventions: Preferred pace was established from the initial three uncued walks. The rate of auditory cues delivered throughout subsequent walks was systematically adjusted for each subject, representing 85, 92.5, 107.5 and 115% of their mean cadence at preferred walking pace. Main outcome measures: Mean cadence, mean stride length and mean velocity. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that the mean velocity and mean cadence of subjects' gait significantly (p 0.01) increased relative to baseline values at cue rates of 115 and 107.5% of cadence at preferred pace and decreased at cue rate of 85%. Mean stride length was unaffected by variations in cue rate. Conclusion: The rate of auditory cues, within the range tested, can modulate cadence and thus velocity of gait of subjects with early-stage Parkinson's disease. The provision of auditory cues provides a potential strategy for enhancing walking performance in these patients.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
clinical trial; auditory stimulation; Parkinson disease; gait; walking; motor performance; physiotherapy
ISSN:
0269-2155
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/11/09]
Citation Count:
27 [Scopus, 17/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowe, T. E. (Tracey)-
dc.contributor.authorLövgreen, B. (Brenda)-
dc.contributor.authorCody, F. W. J. (Frederick)-
dc.contributor.authorAshton, V. J. (Vicki)-
dc.contributor.authorOldham, J. A. (Jacqueline)-
dc.contributor.authorWhittaker, V. J. (Victoria)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:46:30Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:46:30Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Rehabilitation; 17 (4): 363-367-
dc.identifier.issn0269-2155-
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/0269215503cr621oa-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58227-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate whether systematically adjusting the rate of auditory cues induces corresponding modulations of the temporal and spatial parameters of gait of patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease. Design: Subjects performed a series of 15 9-metre walks along a level floor under uncued and four cued conditions; the order of cued conditions was randomized. Setting: A physiotherapy gymnasium, Manchester, UK. Subjects: Eleven subjects with early-stage idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Interventions: Preferred pace was established from the initial three uncued walks. The rate of auditory cues delivered throughout subsequent walks was systematically adjusted for each subject, representing 85, 92.5, 107.5 and 115% of their mean cadence at preferred walking pace. Main outcome measures: Mean cadence, mean stride length and mean velocity. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that the mean velocity and mean cadence of subjects' gait significantly (p 0.01) increased relative to baseline values at cue rates of 115 and 107.5% of cadence at preferred pace and decreased at cue rate of 85%. Mean stride length was unaffected by variations in cue rate. Conclusion: The rate of auditory cues, within the range tested, can modulate cadence and thus velocity of gait of subjects with early-stage Parkinson's disease. The provision of auditory cues provides a potential strategy for enhancing walking performance in these patients.-
dc.publisherSage-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/11/09]-
dc.subjectclinical trial-
dc.subjectauditory stimulation-
dc.subjectParkinson disease-
dc.subjectgait-
dc.subjectwalking-
dc.subjectmotor performance-
dc.subjectphysiotherapy-
dc.titleAuditory cues can modify the gait of persons with early stage Parkinson's disease: a method for enhancing parkinsonian walking performance?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Postgraduate Institute. Rehabilitation Research Unit; Manchester Royal Infirmary. Manchester School of Physiotherapy; University of Manchester. School of Biological Sciences.-
dc.identifier.journalClinical Rehabilitation-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount27 [Scopus, 17/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardHowe, T. E. et al. (2003) 'Auditory cues can modify the gait of persons with early stage Parkinson's disease: a method for enhancing parkinsonian walking performance?', Clinical Rehabilitation, 17(4) pp.363-367.-
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