A focus group study of health professionals' views on phantom sensation, phantom pain and the need for patient information

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58229
Title:
A focus group study of health professionals' views on phantom sensation, phantom pain and the need for patient information
Authors:
Mortimer, C. M. (Clare); MacDonald, R. J. M. (Roderick); Martin, D. J. (Denis); McMillan, I. R. (Ian); Ravey, J. (John); Steedman, W. M. (Wilma)
Affiliation:
Queen Margaret University College. Scottish Network for Chronic Pain Research. Edinburgh; The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh; Queen Margaret University College. Deparment of Occupational Therapy and Art Therapies. Edinburgh; University of Ulster. Faculty of Social and Health Sciences. Northern Ireland.
Citation:
Mortimer, C. M. et al. (2004) 'A focus group study of health professionals' views on phantom sensation, phantom pain and the need for patient information', Patient Education and Counseling, 54 (2), pp.221-226.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Patient Education and Counseling
Issue Date:
Aug-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58229
DOI:
10.1016/S0738-3991(03)00237-4
Abstract:
Focus groups with 32 health professionals from pre- and post-amputation care in central Scotland were used to explore perceptions of phantom sensation and pain, and current practice and potential improvements to patient information. Findings were compared to our parallel study of patients' experiences of phantom phenomena and information needs. Professionals' perceptions of phantom phenomena did not always match patient experiences: few professionals were fully aware of the nature, or the problems associated with phantom pain. There was uncertainty about who provided information and reported information was inconsistent and only weakly grounded in theory and mechanism-based management. Whilst there was awareness of the benefits of information, content, mode of delivery and co-ordination were all identified as areas for improvement. Our findings suggest that the information given to patients on phantom phenomena is inconsistent and insufficient. Possible solutions are the development of minimum standards of information and specifically targeted interprofessional education.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
amputation; information; phantom pain; sensation; perceptions; experiences; amputee
ISSN:
0738-3991
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 15/01/2010]
Citation Count:
2 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, C. M. (Clare)-
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, R. J. M. (Roderick)-
dc.contributor.authorMartin, D. J. (Denis)-
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, I. R. (Ian)-
dc.contributor.authorRavey, J. (John)-
dc.contributor.authorSteedman, W. M. (Wilma)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:46:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:46:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004-08-
dc.identifier.citationPatient Education and Counseling; 54 (2): 221-226-
dc.identifier.issn0738-3991-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0738-3991(03)00237-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58229-
dc.description.abstractFocus groups with 32 health professionals from pre- and post-amputation care in central Scotland were used to explore perceptions of phantom sensation and pain, and current practice and potential improvements to patient information. Findings were compared to our parallel study of patients' experiences of phantom phenomena and information needs. Professionals' perceptions of phantom phenomena did not always match patient experiences: few professionals were fully aware of the nature, or the problems associated with phantom pain. There was uncertainty about who provided information and reported information was inconsistent and only weakly grounded in theory and mechanism-based management. Whilst there was awareness of the benefits of information, content, mode of delivery and co-ordination were all identified as areas for improvement. Our findings suggest that the information given to patients on phantom phenomena is inconsistent and insufficient. Possible solutions are the development of minimum standards of information and specifically targeted interprofessional education.-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 15/01/2010]-
dc.subjectamputation-
dc.subjectinformation-
dc.subjectphantom pain-
dc.subjectsensation-
dc.subjectperceptions-
dc.subjectexperiences-
dc.subjectamputee-
dc.titleA focus group study of health professionals' views on phantom sensation, phantom pain and the need for patient information-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentQueen Margaret University College. Scottish Network for Chronic Pain Research. Edinburgh; The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh; Queen Margaret University College. Deparment of Occupational Therapy and Art Therapies. Edinburgh; University of Ulster. Faculty of Social and Health Sciences. Northern Ireland.-
dc.identifier.journalPatient Education and Counseling-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount2 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardMortimer, C. M. et al. (2004) 'A focus group study of health professionals' views on phantom sensation, phantom pain and the need for patient information', Patient Education and Counseling, 54 (2), pp.221-226.-
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