Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58237
Title:
Mechanical testing of hip protectors
Authors:
Nabhani, F. (Farhad); Bamford, J. S. (James)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Science and Technology.
Citation:
Nabhani, F. and Bamford, J. (2002) 'Mechanical testing of hip protectors', Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 124 (3), pp.311-318.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of Materials Processing Technology
Issue Date:
Jun-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58237
DOI:
10.1016/S0924-0136(02)00200-5
Abstract:
A novel hip protector has been designed to reduce the likelihood of hip fracture. The major design criteria were to improve patient compliance by making the protector small, comfortable to wear, and low maintenance. This has been achieved by designing the protector so that it can be worn continuously for periods of 5–7 days without need for replacement. Nursing staff are required to accurately position the device on the skin using an adhesive skin occlusive film (Opsite®). There is no need for special underclothing and the pad can be made smaller since it is unable to slip out of place. Unlike other hip protectors currently available in the market, this protector is waterproof and can be worn at times when there is a high risk of falling such as when bathing or showering. The purpose of this work was to compare the new combination hip protector design with existing designs. A mechanical test rig was designed and built to simulate a person falling with sufficient impact energy to fracture the greater trochanter if unprotected. Essentially the test rig is a drop test machine using dead weights that can be dropped from predetermined heights. The test rig accounts for the shape of the hip and simulates a layer of flesh with skin. Carpet with different types of underlay was placed between the striker mass and the test samples to simulate the floor. For each hip protector, the weight of the striker mass was adjusted to obtain an impact energy of 120 J. Results from the new hip protector have been compared with that from existing hip protector designs.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
hip protector; mechanical testing; impact forces; hip fracture
ISSN:
0924-0136
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 04/01/2010]
Citation Count:
9 [Scopus, 04/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNabhani, F. (Farhad)-
dc.contributor.authorBamford, J. S. (James)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:46:46Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:46:46Z-
dc.date.issued2002-06-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Materials Processing Technology; 124 (3): 311-318-
dc.identifier.issn0924-0136-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0924-0136(02)00200-5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58237-
dc.description.abstractA novel hip protector has been designed to reduce the likelihood of hip fracture. The major design criteria were to improve patient compliance by making the protector small, comfortable to wear, and low maintenance. This has been achieved by designing the protector so that it can be worn continuously for periods of 5–7 days without need for replacement. Nursing staff are required to accurately position the device on the skin using an adhesive skin occlusive film (Opsite®). There is no need for special underclothing and the pad can be made smaller since it is unable to slip out of place. Unlike other hip protectors currently available in the market, this protector is waterproof and can be worn at times when there is a high risk of falling such as when bathing or showering. The purpose of this work was to compare the new combination hip protector design with existing designs. A mechanical test rig was designed and built to simulate a person falling with sufficient impact energy to fracture the greater trochanter if unprotected. Essentially the test rig is a drop test machine using dead weights that can be dropped from predetermined heights. The test rig accounts for the shape of the hip and simulates a layer of flesh with skin. Carpet with different types of underlay was placed between the striker mass and the test samples to simulate the floor. For each hip protector, the weight of the striker mass was adjusted to obtain an impact energy of 120 J. Results from the new hip protector have been compared with that from existing hip protector designs.-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 04/01/2010]-
dc.subjecthip protector-
dc.subjectmechanical testing-
dc.subjectimpact forces-
dc.subjecthip fracture-
dc.titleMechanical testing of hip protectors-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Science and Technology.-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Materials Processing Technology-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount9 [Scopus, 04/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardNabhani, F. and Bamford, J. (2002) 'Mechanical testing of hip protectors', Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 124 (3), pp.311-318.-
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