Lateral weight transference exercises following acute stroke: a preliminary study of clinical effectiveness

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58248
Title:
Lateral weight transference exercises following acute stroke: a preliminary study of clinical effectiveness
Authors:
Howe, T. E. (Tracey); Taylor, I.; Finn, P. (Paul); Jones, H.
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Postgraduate Institute; The James Cook University Hospital. Teesside Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences; University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; Southern General Hospital. WestMARC. Glasgow; University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; The James Cook University Hospital. Physiotherapy Department and Neurosciences. Stroke Rehabilitation.
Citation:
Howe, T. E. et al. (2005) 'Lateral weight transference exercises following acute stroke: a preliminary study of clinical effectiveness', Clinical Rehabilitation, 19 (1), pp.45-53.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Journal:
Clinical Rehabilitation
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58248
DOI:
10.1191/0269215505cr786oa
Abstract:
Objectives: To evaluate a training programme aimed at improving lateral weight transference in patients following acute stroke to determine main treatment effects, if any, to inform the design of future studies. Design: A single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: The Stroke Unit at The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK. Subjects: Thirty-five patients with an acute stroke. Interventions: All subjects received their usual care, including physiotherapy. The treatment group (n / 17) received 12 additional therapy sessions (over four weeks) comprising exercises aimed at improving lateral weight transference in sitting delivered by trained physiotherapy assistants. Main outcome measures: Measures of dynamic reaching, sitting and standing, and static standing balance were undertaken by a blind independent observer. Results: Specific measures of weight displacement in standing and reaching, and timed standing up and sitting down did not detect any differences over time regardless of group. Neither were there any significant changes over time, except for sway during static standing (p B=0.01) and time to return to their original position during dynamic reaching (p / 0.01). Conclusions: A training programme aimed at improving lateral weight transference did not appear to enhance the rehabilitation of acute stroke patients. Improvements observed in postural control in standing and sitting may be attributable to usual care or natural recovery.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
lateral weight transference; acute stroke; training programme; rehabilitation
ISSN:
0269-2155
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/01/2010]
Citation Count:
8 [Scopus, 12/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowe, T. E. (Tracey)-
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, I.-
dc.contributor.authorFinn, P. (Paul)-
dc.contributor.authorJones, H.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:47:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:47:03Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Rehabilitation; 19 (1): 45-53-
dc.identifier.issn0269-2155-
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/0269215505cr786oa-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58248-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate a training programme aimed at improving lateral weight transference in patients following acute stroke to determine main treatment effects, if any, to inform the design of future studies. Design: A single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: The Stroke Unit at The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK. Subjects: Thirty-five patients with an acute stroke. Interventions: All subjects received their usual care, including physiotherapy. The treatment group (n / 17) received 12 additional therapy sessions (over four weeks) comprising exercises aimed at improving lateral weight transference in sitting delivered by trained physiotherapy assistants. Main outcome measures: Measures of dynamic reaching, sitting and standing, and static standing balance were undertaken by a blind independent observer. Results: Specific measures of weight displacement in standing and reaching, and timed standing up and sitting down did not detect any differences over time regardless of group. Neither were there any significant changes over time, except for sway during static standing (p B=0.01) and time to return to their original position during dynamic reaching (p / 0.01). Conclusions: A training programme aimed at improving lateral weight transference did not appear to enhance the rehabilitation of acute stroke patients. Improvements observed in postural control in standing and sitting may be attributable to usual care or natural recovery.-
dc.publisherSAGE Publications-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/01/2010]-
dc.subjectlateral weight transference-
dc.subjectacute stroke-
dc.subjecttraining programme-
dc.subjectrehabilitation-
dc.titleLateral weight transference exercises following acute stroke: a preliminary study of clinical effectiveness-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Postgraduate Institute; The James Cook University Hospital. Teesside Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences; University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; Southern General Hospital. WestMARC. Glasgow; University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; The James Cook University Hospital. Physiotherapy Department and Neurosciences. Stroke Rehabilitation.-
dc.identifier.journalClinical Rehabilitation-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount8 [Scopus, 12/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardHowe, T. E. et al. (2005) 'Lateral weight transference exercises following acute stroke: a preliminary study of clinical effectiveness', Clinical Rehabilitation, 19 (1), pp.45-53.-
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