Health demonstration projects: evaluating a community-based health intervention programme to improve young people's sexual health 

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58253
Title:
Health demonstration projects: evaluating a community-based health intervention programme to improve young people's sexual health 
Authors:
Tucker, J. S. (Janet); van Teijlingen, E. (Edwin); Philip, K. L. (Kate); Shucksmith, J. (Janet) ( 0000-0003-3825-413X ) ; Penney, G. C. (Gillian)
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Dugald Baird Centre; University of Aberdeen. Department of Public Health; University of Aberdeen. School of Education; University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; University of Edinburgh. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Scottish Programme for Clinical Effectiveness in Reproductive Health.
Citation:
Tucker, J. et al. (2006) 'Health demonstration projects: evaluating a community-based health intervention programme to improve young people's sexual health', Critical Public Health, 16 (3), pp.175-189.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Critical Public Health
Issue Date:
Sep-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58253
DOI:
10.1080/09581590600986358
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09581590600986358
Abstract:
There has been criticism of systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have shown little evidence of effect of interventions to improve teenage sexual health. Moreover, there is considerable controversy surrounding the validity of outcomes and rigour of design in evaluation methods for community-based programmes. In this climate, Scotland launched Healthy Respect, one of four community-based national Demonstration Projects, to address teenage sexual health. Healthy Respect is a complex and multi-stranded intervention in Lothian Region that includes education and health-promotion activities and alternative ways to provide sexual health services for young people. A multidisciplinary research team at the University of Aberdeen was appointed to undertake an independent evaluation of this demonstration project. Challenging some aspects of theory-based evaluation, it is argued that adopting both quantitative and qualitative methods will provide an understanding of both the context and process of this Health Demonstration Project, as well as tracking outcomes, including behavioural change, in the target population. The authors' evaluation includes: examining the process of implementation; comparative regional mapping of the service context including inter-agency partnership working; and assessing effectiveness using a quasi-experimental design and adjusted, population-based, behavioural and sexual health outcomes. Evaluation from these key perspectives contributes to a balanced appraisal of a complex, community-based health promotion and service delivery intervention.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
evaluation; quantitative methods; qualitative methods; community-based demonstration project; sexual health; teenage; Scotland; young people
ISSN:
1469-3682
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/01/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 12/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTucker, J. S. (Janet)-
dc.contributor.authorvan Teijlingen, E. (Edwin)-
dc.contributor.authorPhilip, K. L. (Kate)-
dc.contributor.authorShucksmith, J. (Janet)-
dc.contributor.authorPenney, G. C. (Gillian)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:47:11Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2006-09-
dc.identifier.citationCritical Public Health; 16 (3): 175-189-
dc.identifier.issn1469-3682-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09581590600986358-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58253-
dc.description.abstractThere has been criticism of systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have shown little evidence of effect of interventions to improve teenage sexual health. Moreover, there is considerable controversy surrounding the validity of outcomes and rigour of design in evaluation methods for community-based programmes. In this climate, Scotland launched Healthy Respect, one of four community-based national Demonstration Projects, to address teenage sexual health. Healthy Respect is a complex and multi-stranded intervention in Lothian Region that includes education and health-promotion activities and alternative ways to provide sexual health services for young people. A multidisciplinary research team at the University of Aberdeen was appointed to undertake an independent evaluation of this demonstration project. Challenging some aspects of theory-based evaluation, it is argued that adopting both quantitative and qualitative methods will provide an understanding of both the context and process of this Health Demonstration Project, as well as tracking outcomes, including behavioural change, in the target population. The authors' evaluation includes: examining the process of implementation; comparative regional mapping of the service context including inter-agency partnership working; and assessing effectiveness using a quasi-experimental design and adjusted, population-based, behavioural and sexual health outcomes. Evaluation from these key perspectives contributes to a balanced appraisal of a complex, community-based health promotion and service delivery intervention.-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis-
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09581590600986358-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/01/2010]-
dc.subjectevaluation-
dc.subjectquantitative methods-
dc.subjectqualitative methods-
dc.subjectcommunity-based demonstration project-
dc.subjectsexual health-
dc.subjectteenage-
dc.subjectScotland-
dc.subjectyoung people-
dc.titleHealth demonstration projects: evaluating a community-based health intervention programme to improve young people's sexual health -
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Aberdeen. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Dugald Baird Centre; University of Aberdeen. Department of Public Health; University of Aberdeen. School of Education; University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; University of Edinburgh. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Scottish Programme for Clinical Effectiveness in Reproductive Health.-
dc.identifier.journalCritical Public Health-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 12/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardTucker, J. et al. (2006) 'Health demonstration projects: evaluating a community-based health intervention programme to improve young people's sexual health', Critical Public Health, 16 (3), pp.175-189.-
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