Influence of illness script components and medical practice on medical decision making  

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58258
Title:
Influence of illness script components and medical practice on medical decision making  
Authors:
van Schaik, P. (Paul) ( 0000-0001-5322-6554 ) ; Flynn, D. (Darren); van Wersch, A. (Anna); Douglass, A. (Andrew); Cann, P. (Paul)
Citation:
van Schaik, P. et al. (2005) 'Influence of illness script components and medical practice on medical decision making', Journal of Experimental Psychology Applied, 11 (3), pp.187-199.
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Journal:
Journal of Experimental Psychology Applied
Issue Date:
Sep-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58258
DOI:
10.1037/1076-898X.11.3.187
Abstract:
Illness scripts are knowledge structures composed of consequences, enabling conditions, and faults. The effects of illness script components -consequences and enabling conditions - and physician factors on referral decisions for gastrointestinal disorders were investigated. The hypothesis that consequences and enabling conditions increase the likelihood of referral was confirmed and several interactions between consequences and enabling conditions were found. The hypothesis that physician factors moderate the effect of enabling conditions was also confirmed, but (contrary to illness script theory) evidence was also found for moderation of consequences. Both enabling conditions and consequences were found to be moderated by physician factors to a larger extent than previously assumed by illness script theory.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
illness scripts; influence; medical practice; decision making; gastrointestinal disorders
ISSN:
1076-898X
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 07/01/2010]
Citation Count:
6 [Scopus, 07/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorvan Schaik, P. (Paul)-
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, D. (Darren)-
dc.contributor.authorvan Wersch, A. (Anna)-
dc.contributor.authorDouglass, A. (Andrew)-
dc.contributor.authorCann, P. (Paul)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:47:19Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:47:19Z-
dc.date.issued2005-09-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Experimental Psychology Applied; 11 (3): 187-199-
dc.identifier.issn1076-898X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/1076-898X.11.3.187-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58258-
dc.description.abstractIllness scripts are knowledge structures composed of consequences, enabling conditions, and faults. The effects of illness script components -consequences and enabling conditions - and physician factors on referral decisions for gastrointestinal disorders were investigated. The hypothesis that consequences and enabling conditions increase the likelihood of referral was confirmed and several interactions between consequences and enabling conditions were found. The hypothesis that physician factors moderate the effect of enabling conditions was also confirmed, but (contrary to illness script theory) evidence was also found for moderation of consequences. Both enabling conditions and consequences were found to be moderated by physician factors to a larger extent than previously assumed by illness script theory.-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 07/01/2010]-
dc.subjectillness scripts-
dc.subjectinfluence-
dc.subjectmedical practice-
dc.subjectdecision making-
dc.subjectgastrointestinal disorders-
dc.titleInfluence of illness script components and medical practice on medical decision making  -
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Psychology Applied-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount6 [Scopus, 07/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardvan Schaik, P. et al. (2005) 'Influence of illness script components and medical practice on medical decision making', Journal of Experimental Psychology Applied, 11 (3), pp.187-199.-
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