The changing face of death: implications for public health

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58269
Title:
The changing face of death: implications for public health
Authors:
Conway, S. (Steve)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care.
Citation:
Conway, S. (2007) 'The changing face of death: implications for public health', Critical Public Health, 17 (3), pp.195-202.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Critical Public Health
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58269
DOI:
10.1080/09581590701557975
Abstract:
Palliative care and bereavement care attempt to foster greater dignity in death and loss. Yet the former has been criticised for 'creeping medicalisation' and the latter for individualising grief and loss to the 'talking therapies'. In a broad sense, amongst the dying, their communities and advocates, there is growing recognition of the positive aspects of more collective responses to death to integrate the dying, public health and community. In response to Kellehear's call for public health to consider the above issues as a matter of priority, this essay describes the changing way death has been experienced and managed in empirical, conceptual, and theoretical terms. It then moves on to explore the implications for public health.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
public health; death; loss; palliative care
ISSN:
0958-1596
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 27/11/09]
Citation Count:
2 [Scopus, 27/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorConway, S. (Steve)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:47:36Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:47:36Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09-
dc.identifier.citationCritical Public Health; 17 (3): 195-202-
dc.identifier.issn0958-1596-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09581590701557975-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58269-
dc.description.abstractPalliative care and bereavement care attempt to foster greater dignity in death and loss. Yet the former has been criticised for 'creeping medicalisation' and the latter for individualising grief and loss to the 'talking therapies'. In a broad sense, amongst the dying, their communities and advocates, there is growing recognition of the positive aspects of more collective responses to death to integrate the dying, public health and community. In response to Kellehear's call for public health to consider the above issues as a matter of priority, this essay describes the changing way death has been experienced and managed in empirical, conceptual, and theoretical terms. It then moves on to explore the implications for public health.-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 27/11/09]-
dc.subjectpublic health-
dc.subjectdeath-
dc.subjectloss-
dc.subjectpalliative care-
dc.titleThe changing face of death: implications for public health-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care.-
dc.identifier.journalCritical Public Health-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount2 [Scopus, 27/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardConway, S. (2007) 'The changing face of death: implications for public health', Critical Public Health, 17 (3), pp.195-202.-
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