Ageing and imagined community: some cultural constructions and reconstructions

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58272
Title:
Ageing and imagined community: some cultural constructions and reconstructions
Authors:
Conway, S. (Steve)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Conway, S. (2003) 'Ageing and imagined community: some cultural constructions and reconstructions', Sociological Research Online, 8 (2). http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/2/conway.html [Accessed 27/11/2009].
Publisher:
Sociological Research Online
Journal:
Sociological Research Online
Issue Date:
31-May-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58272
Additional Links:
http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/2/conway.html
Abstract:
This paper develops Anderson's (1983) concept of 'imagined community' to explore the social meaning of popular images of ageing and the beliefs of older people. Popular iconography and texts are examined in relation to the representation of 'normal' or 'positive' ageing in areas including the marketing of seaside towns as places for retirement through the emphasis upon heritage, British holiday brochures for old people, lifestyle magazines, and the general sites of death, dying, funerals and bereavement 'therapy'. These are seen as prescriptive representations that are sanitised and fictional. Emphasising communalism and homogeneity, they ignore the realities of history, and the differences and inequalities to be found amongst the old as a social group. This 'vocabulary of motive' (Mills 1940) of imagined community is found to be predominant within positive images of ageing, especially those found in 'consumer culture'. The paper also considers how ageing can become a theatre for the interpretation and performance of imagined community in autobiographical context.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
autobiography; beliefs; ageing; imagined community; vocabulary of motive
ISSN:
1360-7804
Rights:
This article is available on open access at http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/2/conway.html.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorConway, S. (Steve)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:47:41Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:47:41Z-
dc.date.issued2003-05-31-
dc.identifier.citationSociological Research Online; Volume 8 (2)-
dc.identifier.issn1360-7804-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58272-
dc.description.abstractThis paper develops Anderson's (1983) concept of 'imagined community' to explore the social meaning of popular images of ageing and the beliefs of older people. Popular iconography and texts are examined in relation to the representation of 'normal' or 'positive' ageing in areas including the marketing of seaside towns as places for retirement through the emphasis upon heritage, British holiday brochures for old people, lifestyle magazines, and the general sites of death, dying, funerals and bereavement 'therapy'. These are seen as prescriptive representations that are sanitised and fictional. Emphasising communalism and homogeneity, they ignore the realities of history, and the differences and inequalities to be found amongst the old as a social group. This 'vocabulary of motive' (Mills 1940) of imagined community is found to be predominant within positive images of ageing, especially those found in 'consumer culture'. The paper also considers how ageing can become a theatre for the interpretation and performance of imagined community in autobiographical context.-
dc.publisherSociological Research Online-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/2/conway.html-
dc.rightsThis article is available on open access at http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/2/conway.html.-
dc.subjectautobiography-
dc.subjectbeliefs-
dc.subjectageing-
dc.subjectimagined community-
dc.subjectvocabulary of motive-
dc.titleAgeing and imagined community: some cultural constructions and reconstructions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside-
dc.identifier.journalSociological Research Online-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
or.citation.harvardConway, S. (2003) 'Ageing and imagined community: some cultural constructions and reconstructions', Sociological Research Online, 8 (2). http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/2/conway.html [Accessed 27/11/2009].-
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