Obesity surgery in England: an examination of the health episode statistics 1996-2005

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58286
Title:
Obesity surgery in England: an examination of the health episode statistics 1996-2005
Authors:
Ells, L. J. (Louisa); Macknight, N. (Neil); Wilkinson, J. R. (John)
Affiliation:
University of Durham Queen’s Campus. Wolfson Research Institute. North-East Public Health Observatory.
Citation:
Ells, L. J., Macknight, N. and Wilkinson, J. R. (2007) 'Obesity surgery in England: an examination of the health episode statistics 1996-2005', Obesity Surgery, 17 (3), pp.400-405.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
Obesity Surgery
Issue Date:
Mar-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58286
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-007-9070-x
PubMed ID:
17546850
Abstract:
Background: The authors examined the uptake of obesity surgery across England. Methods: Data were analyzed from the Hospital Episode Statistics covering all 9 goverment office regions with a total population of 49.1 million. The data analyzed covered 9 years 1996/97 – 2004/05. Results: 1,465 records were identified with a primary diagnostic code for obesity and an operation code for obesity surgery. The surgery was performed mostly in women (male to female ratio of 1:5), who were predominantly mid-aged (average 40.4 years ± SD 9.00), the majority of whom reside in local authority districts ranked within the lowest two deprivation quintiles. The availability of obesity surgery varied considerably across the 9 different regions of England, although the number of operations increased nationally over time. Conclusions: Access to this intervention is highly variable and does not appear to reflect estimated regional differences in morbid obesity. This specialist service may benefit from more effective national organization, to ensure appropriate capacity and eliminate inequalities in service delivery.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
obesity surgery; morbid obesity; hospital data; England
ISSN:
1708-0428
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorElls, L. J. (Louisa)-
dc.contributor.authorMacknight, N. (Neil)-
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, J. R. (John)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:48:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2007-03-
dc.identifier.citationObesity Surgery; 17 (3): 400-405-
dc.identifier.issn1708-0428-
dc.identifier.pmid17546850-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11695-007-9070-x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58286-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The authors examined the uptake of obesity surgery across England. Methods: Data were analyzed from the Hospital Episode Statistics covering all 9 goverment office regions with a total population of 49.1 million. The data analyzed covered 9 years 1996/97 – 2004/05. Results: 1,465 records were identified with a primary diagnostic code for obesity and an operation code for obesity surgery. The surgery was performed mostly in women (male to female ratio of 1:5), who were predominantly mid-aged (average 40.4 years ± SD 9.00), the majority of whom reside in local authority districts ranked within the lowest two deprivation quintiles. The availability of obesity surgery varied considerably across the 9 different regions of England, although the number of operations increased nationally over time. Conclusions: Access to this intervention is highly variable and does not appear to reflect estimated regional differences in morbid obesity. This specialist service may benefit from more effective national organization, to ensure appropriate capacity and eliminate inequalities in service delivery.-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]-
dc.subjectobesity surgery-
dc.subjectmorbid obesity-
dc.subjecthospital data-
dc.subjectEngland-
dc.titleObesity surgery in England: an examination of the health episode statistics 1996-2005-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Durham Queen’s Campus. Wolfson Research Institute. North-East Public Health Observatory.-
dc.identifier.journalObesity Surgery-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardElls, L. J., Macknight, N. and Wilkinson, J. R. (2007) 'Obesity surgery in England: an examination of the health episode statistics 1996-2005', Obesity Surgery, 17 (3), pp.400-405.-

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