Chemical and sol–gel processing of tellurite glasses for optoelectronics

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58326
Title:
Chemical and sol–gel processing of tellurite glasses for optoelectronics
Authors:
Hodgson, S. N. B. (Simon); Weng, L. T. (Luqian)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Science and Technology; Harbin Institute of Technology. Shenzen Graduate School.
Citation:
Hodgson, S. N. B. and Weng, L. (2006) 'Chemical and sol–gel processing of tellurite glasses for optoelectronics', Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics, 17 (9), pp.723-733.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics
Issue Date:
Sep-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58326
DOI:
10.1007/s10854-006-0016-1
Abstract:
Recent developments in the application of sol–gel processing technology for tellurite glass systems are reviewed and reported. The processing of tellurite glasses via sol–gel entails some difficulties, mainly due to the anomalously high reactivity of Te(IV) alkoxides toward hydrolysis. Although conventional approaches to steric stabilisation of the alkoxides is not successful for these compounds, various successful approaches have been developed which allow the fabrication of transparent films from these precursors. In particular, diol complexation, chemical liberation of water from esterification processes and peptisation methods have been demonstrated. Other successful approaches involve the use of Te(VI) alkoxides and acids as precursors, with TeO2 based glasses being formed via TeO3 intermediates which liberate oxygen during heat treatment. One drawback with all these methods is the inherent thermal instability of the sol–gel derived material, which leads to both the liberation of free tellurium and devitrification of the glass on heat treatment. However this problem is less significant when Te(VI) precursors are used. The fabrication of multicomponent tellurite glasses by sol–gel approaches is very successful. Systems such as TeO2–TiO2 and TeO2–PbO–TiO2 have been successfully fabricated, and exhibit much greater resistance to devitrification allowing fully dense, transparent glasses to be produced.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
sol–gel; tellurite glasses; alkoxides; glasses; esterification; heat treatment; hydrolysis; optical glass; thermodynamic stability; peptisation methods
ISSN:
1573-482X
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 26/11/09]
Citation Count:
7 [Scopus, 26/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHodgson, S. N. B. (Simon)-
dc.contributor.authorWeng, L. T. (Luqian)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:49:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:49:06Z-
dc.date.issued2006-09-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics; 17 (9): 723-733-
dc.identifier.issn1573-482X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10854-006-0016-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58326-
dc.description.abstractRecent developments in the application of sol–gel processing technology for tellurite glass systems are reviewed and reported. The processing of tellurite glasses via sol–gel entails some difficulties, mainly due to the anomalously high reactivity of Te(IV) alkoxides toward hydrolysis. Although conventional approaches to steric stabilisation of the alkoxides is not successful for these compounds, various successful approaches have been developed which allow the fabrication of transparent films from these precursors. In particular, diol complexation, chemical liberation of water from esterification processes and peptisation methods have been demonstrated. Other successful approaches involve the use of Te(VI) alkoxides and acids as precursors, with TeO2 based glasses being formed via TeO3 intermediates which liberate oxygen during heat treatment. One drawback with all these methods is the inherent thermal instability of the sol–gel derived material, which leads to both the liberation of free tellurium and devitrification of the glass on heat treatment. However this problem is less significant when Te(VI) precursors are used. The fabrication of multicomponent tellurite glasses by sol–gel approaches is very successful. Systems such as TeO2–TiO2 and TeO2–PbO–TiO2 have been successfully fabricated, and exhibit much greater resistance to devitrification allowing fully dense, transparent glasses to be produced.-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 26/11/09]-
dc.subjectsol–gel-
dc.subjecttellurite glasses-
dc.subjectalkoxides-
dc.subjectglasses-
dc.subjectesterification-
dc.subjectheat treatment-
dc.subjecthydrolysis-
dc.subjectoptical glass-
dc.subjectthermodynamic stability-
dc.subjectpeptisation methods-
dc.titleChemical and sol–gel processing of tellurite glasses for optoelectronics-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Science and Technology; Harbin Institute of Technology. Shenzen Graduate School.-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount7 [Scopus, 26/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardHodgson, S. N. B. and Weng, L. (2006) 'Chemical and sol–gel processing of tellurite glasses for optoelectronics', Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics, 17 (9), pp.723-733.-
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