Atrazine catabolism by a combined bacterial association (KRA30) under carbon- and nitrogen-limitations in a retentostat

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58368
Title:
Atrazine catabolism by a combined bacterial association (KRA30) under carbon- and nitrogen-limitations in a retentostat
Authors:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang); Costa, C.; Röling, W. F. M. (Wilfred); Braster, M. (Martin); Senior, E. (Eric); van Verseveld, H. W. (Henk)
Affiliation:
University of Natal. School of Applied Environmental Sciences. International Centre for Waste Technology (Africa); Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan, Amsterdam. Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Department of Molecular Cell Physiology.
Citation:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. et al. (2003) 'Atrazine catabolism by a combined bacterial association (KRA30) under carbon- and nitrogen-limitations in a retentostat', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 94 (6), pp.1043-1051.
Publisher:
Society for Applied Microbiology
Journal:
Journal of Applied Microbiology
Issue Date:
Jun-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58368
DOI:
10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.01925.x
Abstract:
Aims: Nutrient-limited atrazine catabolism study in continuous cultures with biomass retention to mimic in situ environmental conditions and thus gain insight of the efficacy of biosupplementation/biostimulation to eliminate reduced herbicide bioavailability. Methods and Results: Carbon- and nitrogen-limited retentostat (1 and 5 l) cultivation of a combined atrazine (100 mg l−1)-catabolizing association KRA30 was made. As a nitrogen source, through citrate supplementation, increased herbicide catabolism resulted and was complete in the absence of NH4-N. Co-metabolism of the molecule in the presence of succinate was identified. Population characterization by polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR–DGGE) indicated component species numerical dominance shifts in response to changes in nutrient limitation, mineral salts composition and biofilm formation, although the total species complement and catabolic potential were retained. Conclusions: Biomass and catabolic capacity maintenance, through cost-effective biosupplementation/biostimulation, should promote atrazine bioavailability and so ensure successful amelioration. Significance and Impact of the Study: All planning, implementation and monitoring of bioremediation programmes should be underpinned by a combination of molecular and (continuous) culture-based methods.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
atrazine catabolism; nutrient limitation; retentostat cultivation; PCR–DGGE
ISSN:
1364-5072
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 11/11/09].
Citation Count:
4 [Scopus, 11/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRalebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang)-
dc.contributor.authorCosta, C.-
dc.contributor.authorRöling, W. F. M. (Wilfred)-
dc.contributor.authorBraster, M. (Martin)-
dc.contributor.authorSenior, E. (Eric)-
dc.contributor.authorvan Verseveld, H. W. (Henk)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:50:15Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:50:15Z-
dc.date.issued2003-06-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Microbiology; 94 (6): 1043-1051-
dc.identifier.issn1364-5072-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.01925.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58368-
dc.description.abstractAims: Nutrient-limited atrazine catabolism study in continuous cultures with biomass retention to mimic in situ environmental conditions and thus gain insight of the efficacy of biosupplementation/biostimulation to eliminate reduced herbicide bioavailability. Methods and Results: Carbon- and nitrogen-limited retentostat (1 and 5 l) cultivation of a combined atrazine (100 mg l−1)-catabolizing association KRA30 was made. As a nitrogen source, through citrate supplementation, increased herbicide catabolism resulted and was complete in the absence of NH4-N. Co-metabolism of the molecule in the presence of succinate was identified. Population characterization by polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR–DGGE) indicated component species numerical dominance shifts in response to changes in nutrient limitation, mineral salts composition and biofilm formation, although the total species complement and catabolic potential were retained. Conclusions: Biomass and catabolic capacity maintenance, through cost-effective biosupplementation/biostimulation, should promote atrazine bioavailability and so ensure successful amelioration. Significance and Impact of the Study: All planning, implementation and monitoring of bioremediation programmes should be underpinned by a combination of molecular and (continuous) culture-based methods.-
dc.publisherSociety for Applied Microbiology-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 11/11/09].-
dc.subjectatrazine catabolism-
dc.subjectnutrient limitation-
dc.subjectretentostat cultivation-
dc.subjectPCR–DGGE-
dc.titleAtrazine catabolism by a combined bacterial association (KRA30) under carbon- and nitrogen-limitations in a retentostat-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Natal. School of Applied Environmental Sciences. International Centre for Waste Technology (Africa); Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan, Amsterdam. Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Department of Molecular Cell Physiology.-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Microbiology-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount4 [Scopus, 11/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardRalebitso-Senior, T. K. et al. (2003) 'Atrazine catabolism by a combined bacterial association (KRA30) under carbon- and nitrogen-limitations in a retentostat', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 94 (6), pp.1043-1051.-
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