Insights into bacterial associations catabolizing atrazine by culture-dependent and molecular approaches

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58370
Title:
Insights into bacterial associations catabolizing atrazine by culture-dependent and molecular approaches
Authors:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang); Yamazoe, A.; Röling, W. F. M. (Wilfred); Braster, M. (Martin); Senior, E. (Eric); van Verseveld, H. W. (Henk)
Affiliation:
University of Natal. School of Applied Environmental Sciences. International Centre for Waste Technology (Africa); Vrije Universiteit. Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences. Department of Molecular Cell Physiology. The Netherlands.
Citation:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. et al. (2003) 'Insights into bacterial associations catabolizing atrazine by culture-dependent and molecular approaches', World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 19 (1), pp.59-67.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Issue Date:
Feb-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58370
DOI:
10.1023/A:1022531919239
Abstract:
With the specific selection pressures of four atrazine concentrations (10–33 mg l–1) and two pH values (5.5 and 7.5), eight atrazine-catabolizing microbial associations were enriched and isolated from pesticide-contaminated South African loamy soil. Community-level physiological profiling of Environmental Biolog analysis data identified species complement differences in response to both pH and atrazine concentration and these were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). These differences were not detected by conventional plate cultures and light and scanning electron microscopy. To probe atrazine catabolism under a range of environmental conditions, the two (pH 5.5, KRA02; pH 7.5, KRA06) associations catabolizing 30 mg atrazine l–1 were combined (KRA30). The highest specific growth rate was recorded at pH 4, while at pH 8 little growth resulted. With pH 4-poised cultures, the specific growth rates at 15 and 20 °C were comparable but more than doubled for the next 10° increment. These differences reflected species complement changes. Direct comparison of KRA30 with a reference strain, Pseudomonassp. strain ADP, identified comparable specific growth and atrazine catabolic rates. To probe catabolism further, nitrogen-limited batch cultures were made in the presence of supplemental carbon (citrate) but the catabolic rate did not change. The results are discussed with reference to in situ bioaugmentation remediation programmes.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
catabolic microbial associations; nutrient supplementation; PCR-DGGE; polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis
ISSN:
1573-0972
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]
Citation Count:
2 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRalebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang)-
dc.contributor.authorYamazoe, A.-
dc.contributor.authorRöling, W. F. M. (Wilfred)-
dc.contributor.authorBraster, M. (Martin)-
dc.contributor.authorSenior, E. (Eric)-
dc.contributor.authorvan Verseveld, H. W. (Henk)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:50:18Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:50:18Z-
dc.date.issued2003-02-
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology; 19 (1): 59-67-
dc.identifier.issn1573-0972-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1022531919239-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58370-
dc.description.abstractWith the specific selection pressures of four atrazine concentrations (10–33 mg l–1) and two pH values (5.5 and 7.5), eight atrazine-catabolizing microbial associations were enriched and isolated from pesticide-contaminated South African loamy soil. Community-level physiological profiling of Environmental Biolog analysis data identified species complement differences in response to both pH and atrazine concentration and these were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). These differences were not detected by conventional plate cultures and light and scanning electron microscopy. To probe atrazine catabolism under a range of environmental conditions, the two (pH 5.5, KRA02; pH 7.5, KRA06) associations catabolizing 30 mg atrazine l–1 were combined (KRA30). The highest specific growth rate was recorded at pH 4, while at pH 8 little growth resulted. With pH 4-poised cultures, the specific growth rates at 15 and 20 °C were comparable but more than doubled for the next 10° increment. These differences reflected species complement changes. Direct comparison of KRA30 with a reference strain, Pseudomonassp. strain ADP, identified comparable specific growth and atrazine catabolic rates. To probe catabolism further, nitrogen-limited batch cultures were made in the presence of supplemental carbon (citrate) but the catabolic rate did not change. The results are discussed with reference to in situ bioaugmentation remediation programmes.-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]-
dc.subjectcatabolic microbial associations-
dc.subjectnutrient supplementation-
dc.subjectPCR-DGGE-
dc.subjectpolymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis-
dc.titleInsights into bacterial associations catabolizing atrazine by culture-dependent and molecular approaches-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Natal. School of Applied Environmental Sciences. International Centre for Waste Technology (Africa); Vrije Universiteit. Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences. Department of Molecular Cell Physiology. The Netherlands.-
dc.identifier.journalWorld Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount2 [Scopus, 15/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardRalebitso-Senior, T. K. et al. (2003) 'Insights into bacterial associations catabolizing atrazine by culture-dependent and molecular approaches', World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 19 (1), pp.59-67.-
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