The social impact of counter terrorist finance policies in the UK

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58421
Title:
The social impact of counter terrorist finance policies in the UK
Authors:
Sproat, P. A. (Peter)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Centre for Fraud Management Studies.
Citation:
Sproat, P. A. (2005) 'The social impact of counter terrorist finance policies in the UK', Crime Law and Social Change, 44 (4-5), pp.441-464.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
Crime Law and Social Change
Issue Date:
Dec-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58421
DOI:
10.1007/s10611-006-9029-1
Abstract:
There appears to be little doubt that unlike many of the other aspects of the ‘war on terror’ the measures introduced to suppress the financing of terrorism have been subject to relatively little critical scrutiny compared to other aspects such as interrogation and detention regimes and the military invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. More importantly, it appears that these have been subject to relatively little critical scrutiny in absolute terms and most of the small number of critical academic papers seem to concentrate on the actions of the USA – even when they cover counter-terrorist finance (CTF) in Western countries generally. Those criticisms that do occur can be placed into four groups, namely those concerned with: the efficiency of the system; the ethical acceptability of the policies; the potential abuse of the legislation; and the actual impact of these measures on individuals, groups or sectors in a society itself. This paper has space to deal with only one of these types of criticisms and it is upon the latter of these that it will concentrate. Moreover, it will examine the negative impact these measures are alleged to have had on individuals, groups or sectors within only one society – the United Kingdom. It is this assessment of the alleged negative effects of CTF laws in the UK only that distinguishes this from previous papers. This article then, makes a micro examination of the anti-money laundering/counter-terrorist finance legislation (AML/CTF) and the claims that it has increased financial exclusion, made it difficult for people to send remittances abroad and has damaged Islamic charities and civil society generally (as part of a neo-colonial/neo-liberal plan). These are serious charges and if they are to be substantiated, clear evidence for each should be adduced and the exact mechanisms by they occur should be presented. In order to achieve this aim, the paper will briefly describe the AML/CTF policies within the UK, before describing its alleged negative impact on individuals, groups or sectors within the country and assessing the credibility of these claims.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
counter terrorist finance; social impact; UK; policy
ISSN:
0925-4994
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 18/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSproat, P. A. (Peter)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:51:40Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:51:40Z-
dc.date.issued2005-12-
dc.identifier.citationCrime Law and Social Change; 44 (4-5): 441-464-
dc.identifier.issn0925-4994-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10611-006-9029-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58421-
dc.description.abstractThere appears to be little doubt that unlike many of the other aspects of the ‘war on terror’ the measures introduced to suppress the financing of terrorism have been subject to relatively little critical scrutiny compared to other aspects such as interrogation and detention regimes and the military invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. More importantly, it appears that these have been subject to relatively little critical scrutiny in absolute terms and most of the small number of critical academic papers seem to concentrate on the actions of the USA – even when they cover counter-terrorist finance (CTF) in Western countries generally. Those criticisms that do occur can be placed into four groups, namely those concerned with: the efficiency of the system; the ethical acceptability of the policies; the potential abuse of the legislation; and the actual impact of these measures on individuals, groups or sectors in a society itself. This paper has space to deal with only one of these types of criticisms and it is upon the latter of these that it will concentrate. Moreover, it will examine the negative impact these measures are alleged to have had on individuals, groups or sectors within only one society – the United Kingdom. It is this assessment of the alleged negative effects of CTF laws in the UK only that distinguishes this from previous papers. This article then, makes a micro examination of the anti-money laundering/counter-terrorist finance legislation (AML/CTF) and the claims that it has increased financial exclusion, made it difficult for people to send remittances abroad and has damaged Islamic charities and civil society generally (as part of a neo-colonial/neo-liberal plan). These are serious charges and if they are to be substantiated, clear evidence for each should be adduced and the exact mechanisms by they occur should be presented. In order to achieve this aim, the paper will briefly describe the AML/CTF policies within the UK, before describing its alleged negative impact on individuals, groups or sectors within the country and assessing the credibility of these claims.-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]-
dc.subjectcounter terrorist finance-
dc.subjectsocial impact-
dc.subjectUK-
dc.subjectpolicy-
dc.titleThe social impact of counter terrorist finance policies in the UK-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Centre for Fraud Management Studies.-
dc.identifier.journalCrime Law and Social Change-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 18/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardSproat, P. A. (2005) 'The social impact of counter terrorist finance policies in the UK', Crime Law and Social Change, 44 (4-5), pp.441-464.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.