From virtue to competence: changing the principles of public service

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58425
Title:
From virtue to competence: changing the principles of public service
Authors:
Macaulay, M. (Michael); Lawton, A. L. (Alan)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Teesside Business School; University of Birmingham. School of Public Policy.
Citation:
Macaulay, M. and Lawton, A. L. (2006) 'From virtue to competence: changing the principles of public service', Public Administration Review, 66 (5), pp.702-710.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Public Administration Review
Issue Date:
Sep-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58425
DOI:
10.1111/j.1540-6210.2006.00635.x
Abstract:
Virtue has long been a central principle in the tradition of public service — to what extent is it still relevant today? Focusing on the role of the monitoring officer, a key official in the ethical framework of local government in the United Kingdom, this essay asks which virtues, if any, are still needed for public service and whether these virtues have been displaced by managerial notions of technical competence as the principles of public service delivery. The authors draw an initial distinction between virtue and competence that, upon further investigation, does not appear to be sustainable. Despite being drawn from two different academic perspectives — moral philosophy and management development — the concepts of virtue and competence are, in practice, very similar. This theoretical convergence is reflected in the practical concerns of monitoring officers and their perspective on public service ethics.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
public service; local government; ethics; United Kingdom; UK
ISSN:
0033-3352
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]
Citation Count:
2 [Web of Science, 21/12/09]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacaulay, M. (Michael)-
dc.contributor.authorLawton, A. L. (Alan)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:51:45Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2006-09-
dc.identifier.citationPublic Administration Review; 66 (5): 702-710-
dc.identifier.issn0033-3352-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1540-6210.2006.00635.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58425-
dc.description.abstractVirtue has long been a central principle in the tradition of public service — to what extent is it still relevant today? Focusing on the role of the monitoring officer, a key official in the ethical framework of local government in the United Kingdom, this essay asks which virtues, if any, are still needed for public service and whether these virtues have been displaced by managerial notions of technical competence as the principles of public service delivery. The authors draw an initial distinction between virtue and competence that, upon further investigation, does not appear to be sustainable. Despite being drawn from two different academic perspectives — moral philosophy and management development — the concepts of virtue and competence are, in practice, very similar. This theoretical convergence is reflected in the practical concerns of monitoring officers and their perspective on public service ethics.-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 26/01/2010]-
dc.subjectpublic service-
dc.subjectlocal government-
dc.subjectethics-
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom-
dc.subjectUK-
dc.titleFrom virtue to competence: changing the principles of public service-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Teesside Business School; University of Birmingham. School of Public Policy.-
dc.identifier.journalPublic Administration Review-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount2 [Web of Science, 21/12/09]-
or.citation.harvardMacaulay, M. and Lawton, A. L. (2006) 'From virtue to competence: changing the principles of public service', Public Administration Review, 66 (5), pp.702-710.-
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