The ties that double bind us: career, emotion and narrative coping in difficult working relationships 

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58432
Title:
The ties that double bind us: career, emotion and narrative coping in difficult working relationships 
Authors:
Blenkinsopp, J. (John)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Teesside Business School.
Citation:
Blenkinsopp, J. (2007) 'The ties that double bind us: career, emotion and narrative coping in difficult working relationships', Culture and Organization, 13 (3), pp.251-266.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Culture and Organization
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58432
DOI:
10.1080/14759550701486639
Abstract:
This article examines through an autoethnographic account how career aspirations and constraints may lead individuals to endure emotionally aversive situations. It presents evidence that individuals in such situations engage in emotion-focused coping through narrative, illustrated by the author's autoethnographic narrative of a difficult working relationship which developed into a double bind situation. The paper suggests that narrative coping in response to a double bind can actually serve to reify and prolong such situations. The paper concludes that autoethnographic research does not lend itself to simple organisational solutions. Possible avenues for further research are outlined and discussed.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
autoethnography; career; double bind; emotion; narrative coping
ISSN:
1475-9551
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 04/01/2010]
Citation Count:
0 (Web of Science and Scopus, 04/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBlenkinsopp, J. (John)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:51:56Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:51:56Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09-
dc.identifier.citationCulture and Organization; 13 (3): 251-266-
dc.identifier.issn1475-9551-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14759550701486639-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58432-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines through an autoethnographic account how career aspirations and constraints may lead individuals to endure emotionally aversive situations. It presents evidence that individuals in such situations engage in emotion-focused coping through narrative, illustrated by the author's autoethnographic narrative of a difficult working relationship which developed into a double bind situation. The paper suggests that narrative coping in response to a double bind can actually serve to reify and prolong such situations. The paper concludes that autoethnographic research does not lend itself to simple organisational solutions. Possible avenues for further research are outlined and discussed.-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 04/01/2010]-
dc.subjectautoethnography-
dc.subjectcareer-
dc.subjectdouble bind-
dc.subjectemotion-
dc.subjectnarrative coping-
dc.titleThe ties that double bind us: career, emotion and narrative coping in difficult working relationships -
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Teesside Business School.-
dc.identifier.journalCulture and Organization-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 (Web of Science and Scopus, 04/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardBlenkinsopp, J. (2007) 'The ties that double bind us: career, emotion and narrative coping in difficult working relationships', Culture and Organization, 13 (3), pp.251-266.-
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