In pursuit of the study of pleasure: implications for health research and practice

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58450
Title:
In pursuit of the study of pleasure: implications for health research and practice
Authors:
Coveney, J. (John); Bunton, R. (Robin)
Affiliation:
Flinders University. Australia; University of Teesside.; Social Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.
Citation:
Coveney, J. and Bunton, R. (2003) 'In pursuit of the study of pleasure: implications for health research and practice', Health, 7 (2), pp.161-179.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Journal:
Health
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58450
DOI:
10.1177/1363459303007002873
Abstract:
Many public health interventions attempt to promote health and well-being while simultaneously engaging with or negating pleasure-seeking activities. Yet the examination of pleasure is under-researched, especially within health and health-related areas. We examine pleasure as both an innate drive and a socially constructed phenomenon. Using the development of religious ideas in western cultures, we identify four forms of pleasure: carnal pleasure, disciplined pleasure, ascetic pleasure and ecstatic pleasure. These pleasures dramatically affect the construction of social and cultural identities. Moreover, they influence approaches to our understandings of health in general and interventions to public health in particular. The pursuit of the study of pleasure opens up a number of worthwhile areas for cross-disciplinary discussion and study.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
body; health promotion; history; pleasure; public health; religion
ISSN:
1363-4593
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 06/01/2010]
Citation Count:
17 [Scopus, 06/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCoveney, J. (John)-
dc.contributor.authorBunton, R. (Robin)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:52:22Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:52:22Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationHealth; 7 (2): 161-179-
dc.identifier.issn1363-4593-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1363459303007002873-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58450-
dc.description.abstractMany public health interventions attempt to promote health and well-being while simultaneously engaging with or negating pleasure-seeking activities. Yet the examination of pleasure is under-researched, especially within health and health-related areas. We examine pleasure as both an innate drive and a socially constructed phenomenon. Using the development of religious ideas in western cultures, we identify four forms of pleasure: carnal pleasure, disciplined pleasure, ascetic pleasure and ecstatic pleasure. These pleasures dramatically affect the construction of social and cultural identities. Moreover, they influence approaches to our understandings of health in general and interventions to public health in particular. The pursuit of the study of pleasure opens up a number of worthwhile areas for cross-disciplinary discussion and study.-
dc.publisherSAGE Publications-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 06/01/2010]-
dc.subjectbody-
dc.subjecthealth promotion-
dc.subjecthistory-
dc.subjectpleasure-
dc.subjectpublic health-
dc.subjectreligion-
dc.titleIn pursuit of the study of pleasure: implications for health research and practice-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentFlinders University. Australia; University of Teesside.-
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.-
dc.identifier.journalHealth-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount17 [Scopus, 06/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardCoveney, J. and Bunton, R. (2003) 'In pursuit of the study of pleasure: implications for health research and practice', Health, 7 (2), pp.161-179.-
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