Communicative competence and the improvement of university teaching: insights from the field

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58459
Title:
Communicative competence and the improvement of university teaching: insights from the field
Authors:
Abbas, A. (Andrea); McLean, M. (Monica)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences; Oxford University. Institute for the Advancement of University Learning.; Social Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.
Citation:
Abbas, A. and McLean, M. (2003) 'Communicative competence and the improvement of university teaching: insights from the field', British Journal of Sociology of Education, 24 (1) pp.69-82.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
British Journal of Sociology of Education
Issue Date:
Jan-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58459
DOI:
10.1080/01425690301913
Abstract:
The arguments in this article have been generated from involvement in a government-funded project designed to improve teaching. The authors reflect on their experience and use Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative competence to argue that initiatives designed to improve university teaching often work against their own intentions by closing down opportunities for open dialogue. They argue that improvement of teaching requires undistorted communication and demonstrate that this is made difficult: by the pressure to be seen to succeed; by over-specifying what constitutes good teaching; and, by divorcing research from development. At the same time, they suggest that academics could seize opportunities to open up dialogue about teaching.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
teaching; higher education; university teaching
ISSN:
0142-5692
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/11/09]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 12/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAbbas, A. (Andrea)-
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, M. (Monica)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:52:36Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:52:36Z-
dc.date.issued2003-01-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Sociology of Education; 24 (1): 69-82-
dc.identifier.issn0142-5692-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01425690301913-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58459-
dc.description.abstractThe arguments in this article have been generated from involvement in a government-funded project designed to improve teaching. The authors reflect on their experience and use Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative competence to argue that initiatives designed to improve university teaching often work against their own intentions by closing down opportunities for open dialogue. They argue that improvement of teaching requires undistorted communication and demonstrate that this is made difficult: by the pressure to be seen to succeed; by over-specifying what constitutes good teaching; and, by divorcing research from development. At the same time, they suggest that academics could seize opportunities to open up dialogue about teaching.-
dc.publisherTaylor and Francis-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/11/09]-
dc.subjectteaching-
dc.subjecthigher education-
dc.subjectuniversity teaching-
dc.titleCommunicative competence and the improvement of university teaching: insights from the field-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences; Oxford University. Institute for the Advancement of University Learning.-
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.-
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 12/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardAbbas, A. and McLean, M. (2003) 'Communicative competence and the improvement of university teaching: insights from the field', British Journal of Sociology of Education, 24 (1) pp.69-82.-
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