Young people, illicit drug use and the question of normalization

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58463
Title:
Young people, illicit drug use and the question of normalization
Authors:
Shildrick, T. A. (Tracy)
Affiliation:
Social Futures Institute. Youth Research Unit.
Citation:
Shildrick, T. A. (2002) 'Young people, illicit drug use and the question of normalization', Journal of Youth Studies, 5 (1), pp.35-48.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Journal of Youth Studies
Issue Date:
Mar-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58463
DOI:
10.1080/13676260120111751
Abstract:
The issues of young people and drug taking have a long history, although recently the topic has been debated more intensely than ever before. Of key importance here has been the dramatic rise in the availability, range and consumption of illicit drugs, a factor that, in part, has been linked to the popularity of dance/club cultures. These changes have been interpreted by some, both within and without academia, as being indicative of a process of the 'normalization' of illicit drug use. This paper reports on qualitative research data that explored young people's youth cultural identification and experiences while also enquiring into how such experiences may be related to the use of illicit drugs. This paper critically examines normalization theory and draws attention to weaknesses on both an empirical and a theoretical level. It is suggested in this paper that, as it stands, normalization theory presents an overly simplistic account of young people's drug use. This paper argues instead for a more differentiated understanding of normalization.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
young people; youth; drugs; drug use
ISSN:
1367-6261
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 18/01/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShildrick, T. A. (Tracy)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:52:42Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:52:42Z-
dc.date.issued2002-03-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Youth Studies; 5 (1): 35-48-
dc.identifier.issn1367-6261-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13676260120111751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58463-
dc.description.abstractThe issues of young people and drug taking have a long history, although recently the topic has been debated more intensely than ever before. Of key importance here has been the dramatic rise in the availability, range and consumption of illicit drugs, a factor that, in part, has been linked to the popularity of dance/club cultures. These changes have been interpreted by some, both within and without academia, as being indicative of a process of the 'normalization' of illicit drug use. This paper reports on qualitative research data that explored young people's youth cultural identification and experiences while also enquiring into how such experiences may be related to the use of illicit drugs. This paper critically examines normalization theory and draws attention to weaknesses on both an empirical and a theoretical level. It is suggested in this paper that, as it stands, normalization theory presents an overly simplistic account of young people's drug use. This paper argues instead for a more differentiated understanding of normalization.-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 18/01/2010]-
dc.subjectyoung people-
dc.subjectyouth-
dc.subjectdrugs-
dc.subjectdrug use-
dc.titleYoung people, illicit drug use and the question of normalization-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Youth Research Unit.-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Youth Studies-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardShildrick, T. A. (2002) 'Young people, illicit drug use and the question of normalization', Journal of Youth Studies, 5 (1), pp.35-48.-
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