Public reporting of criminal activities to the police in Greece: is there a difference when the offender is migrant?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58467
Title:
Public reporting of criminal activities to the police in Greece: is there a difference when the offender is migrant?
Authors:
Antonopoulos, G. A. (Georgios)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Antonopoulos, G. A. (2006) 'Public reporting of criminal activities to the police in Greece: is there a difference when the offender is migrant?', European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, 14 (2), pp.135-160.
Publisher:
Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
Journal:
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58467
DOI:
10.1163/157181706777978775
Abstract:
At the beginning of the 1990s Greece, along with other European countries such as Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland, was transformed from a country of emigration to a country of immigration. Since then, the phenomenon of migration in Greece constitutes the central topic of an endless debate amongst politicians, social scientists, the public and the media, which influences the perception, and most importantly the ‘positions’ and reactions of certain individuals and groups (to an unknown extent though), and consequently the state’s control apparatus. The notions of ethnicity and migration have started to concern Greece and become intertwined with several other issues in the social sphere. Migration in Greece, as well as in other countries of the EU and generally the western, rich world, has been identified with a number of ‘social problems’. Hence, there has been a general negative discourse about migrants and migration. The arrival of migrants has been often compared to unstoppable weather and natural phenomena or to invading hordes, their number has been described as a ‘crisis’, and their presence in a country has been discussed within the context of problems of integration and assimilation, unemployment, national insecurity, and crime. The London bombings of 7 July 2005 and the recent riots in the suburbs of Paris and other French cities fed debates of such nature. According to a recent Eurobarometer, immigration is a major cause of concern among the citizens of the 15 old member-states of the EU.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
reporting crime; criminal activity; police; Greece; offender; migrant; immigration; migration
ISSN:
1571-8174
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/12/09]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/12/09]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAntonopoulos, G. A. (Georgios)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:52:48Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:52:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice; 14 (2): 135-160-
dc.identifier.issn1571-8174-
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/157181706777978775-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58467-
dc.description.abstractAt the beginning of the 1990s Greece, along with other European countries such as Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland, was transformed from a country of emigration to a country of immigration. Since then, the phenomenon of migration in Greece constitutes the central topic of an endless debate amongst politicians, social scientists, the public and the media, which influences the perception, and most importantly the ‘positions’ and reactions of certain individuals and groups (to an unknown extent though), and consequently the state’s control apparatus. The notions of ethnicity and migration have started to concern Greece and become intertwined with several other issues in the social sphere. Migration in Greece, as well as in other countries of the EU and generally the western, rich world, has been identified with a number of ‘social problems’. Hence, there has been a general negative discourse about migrants and migration. The arrival of migrants has been often compared to unstoppable weather and natural phenomena or to invading hordes, their number has been described as a ‘crisis’, and their presence in a country has been discussed within the context of problems of integration and assimilation, unemployment, national insecurity, and crime. The London bombings of 7 July 2005 and the recent riots in the suburbs of Paris and other French cities fed debates of such nature. According to a recent Eurobarometer, immigration is a major cause of concern among the citizens of the 15 old member-states of the EU.-
dc.publisherMartinus Nijhoff Publishers-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/12/09]-
dc.subjectreporting crime-
dc.subjectcriminal activity-
dc.subjectpolice-
dc.subjectGreece-
dc.subjectoffender-
dc.subjectmigrant-
dc.subjectimmigration-
dc.subjectmigration-
dc.titlePublic reporting of criminal activities to the police in Greece: is there a difference when the offender is migrant?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside-
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/12/09]-
or.citation.harvardAntonopoulos, G. A. (2006) 'Public reporting of criminal activities to the police in Greece: is there a difference when the offender is migrant?', European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, 14 (2), pp.135-160.-
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