In search of industrial order: the case of Nuremberg's building masters, 1887-1914

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58477
Title:
In search of industrial order: the case of Nuremberg's building masters, 1887-1914
Authors:
Ford, G. (Graham)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Ford, G. (2001) 'In search of industrial order: the case of Nuremberg's building masters, 1887-1914', German History, 19 (1), pp.54-74.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
German History
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58477
DOI:
10.1191/026635501673794015
Abstract:
In 1987 Nuremberg’s Building Guild celebrated its centenary. In the preface to its celebratory Festschrift, the Guild’s Head Master (Obermeister), Siegfried Werner, pointed out that the Guild had survived four different political regimes, to which we can add a fifth in the form of the post-unification Berlin Republic. For although the remnants of the medieval guild system were finally swept away with the introduction of the Gewerbefreiheit (freedom of trade and occupation) throughout the German Empire in 1871, following the onset of economic crisis in 1873, the artisanal movement started to agitate for what Heinrich August Winkler has referred to as ‘social protection’; that is, the replacement of the Gewerbefreiheit by a corporatist economic order based upon compulsory guilds, fixed prices and proof of qualification. Although the artisanal movement failed to achieve its principal objectives before 1914, between 1881 and 1908 the Gewerbefreiheit was modified by a number of corporatist measures. Hence, in 1881 the Industrial Code was amended to allow for the establishment of voluntary guilds as public bodies; these guilds were then granted additional powers in 1884 and 1887. The most significant reform of the Industrial Code, the so- called ‘handicraft law’, followed in 1897. In addition to establishing Chambers of Artisans, which were to oversee apprenticeship and masters’ examinations, the 1897 law allowed for the creation of facultative compulsory guilds. A further amendment, in 1908, introduced the so-called ‘minor proof of qualification’, whereby only qualified masters were given the right to train apprentices in the handicrafts.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
Nuremburg; building masters; building guild; Germany; history; nineteenth century; twentieth century
ISSN:
0266-3554
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/01/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 12/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFord, G. (Graham)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:03Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationGerman History; 19 (1): 54-74-
dc.identifier.issn0266-3554-
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/026635501673794015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58477-
dc.description.abstractIn 1987 Nuremberg’s Building Guild celebrated its centenary. In the preface to its celebratory Festschrift, the Guild’s Head Master (Obermeister), Siegfried Werner, pointed out that the Guild had survived four different political regimes, to which we can add a fifth in the form of the post-unification Berlin Republic. For although the remnants of the medieval guild system were finally swept away with the introduction of the Gewerbefreiheit (freedom of trade and occupation) throughout the German Empire in 1871, following the onset of economic crisis in 1873, the artisanal movement started to agitate for what Heinrich August Winkler has referred to as ‘social protection’; that is, the replacement of the Gewerbefreiheit by a corporatist economic order based upon compulsory guilds, fixed prices and proof of qualification. Although the artisanal movement failed to achieve its principal objectives before 1914, between 1881 and 1908 the Gewerbefreiheit was modified by a number of corporatist measures. Hence, in 1881 the Industrial Code was amended to allow for the establishment of voluntary guilds as public bodies; these guilds were then granted additional powers in 1884 and 1887. The most significant reform of the Industrial Code, the so- called ‘handicraft law’, followed in 1897. In addition to establishing Chambers of Artisans, which were to oversee apprenticeship and masters’ examinations, the 1897 law allowed for the creation of facultative compulsory guilds. A further amendment, in 1908, introduced the so-called ‘minor proof of qualification’, whereby only qualified masters were given the right to train apprentices in the handicrafts.-
dc.publisherOxford University Press-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/01/2010]-
dc.subjectNuremburg-
dc.subjectbuilding masters-
dc.subjectbuilding guild-
dc.subjectGermany-
dc.subjecthistory-
dc.subjectnineteenth century-
dc.subjecttwentieth century-
dc.titleIn search of industrial order: the case of Nuremberg's building masters, 1887-1914-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside-
dc.identifier.journalGerman History-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 12/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardFord, G. (2001) 'In search of industrial order: the case of Nuremberg's building masters, 1887-1914', German History, 19 (1), pp.54-74.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.