The Yeomanry of Robin Hood and Social Terminology in Fifteenth-Century England

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58482
Title:
The Yeomanry of Robin Hood and Social Terminology in Fifteenth-Century England
Authors:
Almond, R. (Richard); Pollard, A. J. (Anthony)
Affiliation:
Darlington College; University of Teesside.
Citation:
Almond, R. and Pollard, A. J. (2001) 'The Yeomanry of Robin Hood and Social Terminology in Fifteenth-Century England', Past & Present 170, (1), pp.52-77.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Past & Present
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58482
DOI:
10.1093/past/170.1.52
Abstract:
'From the moment he first steps on the historical stage', wrote Barrie Dobson and John Taylor in 1976, 'Robin Hood is presented as a yeoman hero for a yeoman audience'. In the ballad of 'Robin Hood and the Potter' the hero is twice identified as the personification of good yeomanry. But, as Dobson and Taylor have pointed out, the precise associations of yeoman status at different times and in different contexts are difficult to pin down. However, in their latest thoughts on the subject they reiterate that, by the time the earliest surviving versions of the tales were committed to writing, no later than the mid-fifteenth century, Robin Hood had emerged 'not only as a new sort of hero but as a hero for a new and large social group, the yeomanry of England'. It was his association with that large, if ill-defined, section of society which provided him with his most distinctive and enduring characteristics.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
yeoman; yeomanry; Robin Hood; fifteenth century; England
ISSN:
1477-464X
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 21/12/09]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 21/12/09]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlmond, R. (Richard)-
dc.contributor.authorPollard, A. J. (Anthony)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:11Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationPast & Present 170; (1): 52-77-
dc.identifier.issn1477-464X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/past/170.1.52-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58482-
dc.description.abstract'From the moment he first steps on the historical stage', wrote Barrie Dobson and John Taylor in 1976, 'Robin Hood is presented as a yeoman hero for a yeoman audience'. In the ballad of 'Robin Hood and the Potter' the hero is twice identified as the personification of good yeomanry. But, as Dobson and Taylor have pointed out, the precise associations of yeoman status at different times and in different contexts are difficult to pin down. However, in their latest thoughts on the subject they reiterate that, by the time the earliest surviving versions of the tales were committed to writing, no later than the mid-fifteenth century, Robin Hood had emerged 'not only as a new sort of hero but as a hero for a new and large social group, the yeomanry of England'. It was his association with that large, if ill-defined, section of society which provided him with his most distinctive and enduring characteristics.-
dc.publisherOxford University Press-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 21/12/09]-
dc.subjectyeoman-
dc.subjectyeomanry-
dc.subjectRobin Hood-
dc.subjectfifteenth century-
dc.subjectEngland-
dc.titleThe Yeomanry of Robin Hood and Social Terminology in Fifteenth-Century England-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentDarlington College; University of Teesside.-
dc.identifier.journalPast & Present-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 21/12/09]-
or.citation.harvardAlmond, R. and Pollard, A. J. (2001) 'The Yeomanry of Robin Hood and Social Terminology in Fifteenth-Century England', Past & Present 170, (1), pp.52-77.-
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