Customs in conflict: some causes of anti-clericalism in rural Norfolk, 1815-1914

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58491
Title:
Customs in conflict: some causes of anti-clericalism in rural Norfolk, 1815-1914
Authors:
Lee, R. (Robert)
Affiliation:
University of Durham. Department of History.
Citation:
Lee, R. (2003) 'Customs in conflict: some causes of anti-clericalism in rural Norfolk, 1815-1914', Rural History, 14 (2), pp.197-218.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
Rural History
Issue Date:
Oct-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58491
DOI:
10.1017/S0956793303001031
Abstract:
This article examines aspects of the relationship between the Norfolk poor and the Norfolk clergy between 1815 and 1914. It considers the potential impact clergymen could have upon a number of areas of secular life, especially with regard to the extirpation of popular culture and custom, the social and moral management inherent in charity and Poor Law administration, and the development of ‘power networks’ in the countryside that confronted the challenge posed by religious Nonconformity and political radicalism. The article is principally concerned with the importance of the Church of England as an instrument of secular authority in nineteenth-century rural life. Rival social structures and conflicting economic interests are subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analysis, while keys to cultural tension are sought in such iconic areas as the pageantry of parish entertainments; the re-casting of law to act against custom; the rise of the clergyman as antiquarian historian and amateur archaeologist; the symbolism and architecture of the restored church. In so doing an attempt is made to address questions that are at once broadly political and narrowly human in their scope. What did the Oxbridge scholar – perhaps having spent the preceding three years conversing in Greek and Latin with his peers – find to ‘say’ to the agricultural labourers now in his pastoral care? And why, when the clergyman (often justifiably) thought of himself as working unstintingly in his parishioners' interests, was he so often heartily despised by them?
Type:
Article
Keywords:
Norfolk; nineteenth century; clergy; anti-clericalism; secular life; poor; Church of England
ISSN:
0956-7933
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). Publishers version/PDF may be used in an institutional repository after 12 month embargo. Permission (not to be unreasonably withheld) needs to be sought if the author is at a different institution to when the article was originally published. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/11/09]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 23/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLee, R. (Robert)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:24Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2003-10-
dc.identifier.citationRural History; 14 (2): 197-218-
dc.identifier.issn0956-7933-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0956793303001031-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58491-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines aspects of the relationship between the Norfolk poor and the Norfolk clergy between 1815 and 1914. It considers the potential impact clergymen could have upon a number of areas of secular life, especially with regard to the extirpation of popular culture and custom, the social and moral management inherent in charity and Poor Law administration, and the development of ‘power networks’ in the countryside that confronted the challenge posed by religious Nonconformity and political radicalism. The article is principally concerned with the importance of the Church of England as an instrument of secular authority in nineteenth-century rural life. Rival social structures and conflicting economic interests are subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analysis, while keys to cultural tension are sought in such iconic areas as the pageantry of parish entertainments; the re-casting of law to act against custom; the rise of the clergyman as antiquarian historian and amateur archaeologist; the symbolism and architecture of the restored church. In so doing an attempt is made to address questions that are at once broadly political and narrowly human in their scope. What did the Oxbridge scholar – perhaps having spent the preceding three years conversing in Greek and Latin with his peers – find to ‘say’ to the agricultural labourers now in his pastoral care? And why, when the clergyman (often justifiably) thought of himself as working unstintingly in his parishioners' interests, was he so often heartily despised by them?-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press-
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). Publishers version/PDF may be used in an institutional repository after 12 month embargo. Permission (not to be unreasonably withheld) needs to be sought if the author is at a different institution to when the article was originally published. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/11/09]-
dc.subjectNorfolk-
dc.subjectnineteenth century-
dc.subjectclergy-
dc.subjectanti-clericalism-
dc.subjectsecular life-
dc.subjectpoor-
dc.subjectChurch of England-
dc.titleCustoms in conflict: some causes of anti-clericalism in rural Norfolk, 1815-1914-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Durham. Department of History.-
dc.identifier.journalRural History-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 23/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardLee, R. (2003) 'Customs in conflict: some causes of anti-clericalism in rural Norfolk, 1815-1914', Rural History, 14 (2), pp.197-218.-
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