Parody, stylization and dialogics: a Bakhtinian reading of the lost girl

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58508
Title:
Parody, stylization and dialogics: a Bakhtinian reading of the lost girl
Authors:
Burden, R. (Robert)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Burden, R. J. (2002) 'Parody, stylization and dialogics: a Bakhtinian reading of the lost girl', D H Lawrence Review, 30 (3), pp.25-42.
Publisher:
D H Lawrence Review
Journal:
D H Lawrence Review
Issue Date:
Sep-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58508
Abstract:
In this paper the author addresses the issue of the place in Bakhtin in Lawrence studies, first with some general points about the Bakhtinian readings of Lawrence; second with some of the key concepts in Bakhtin's theory revisited; and third, with the authors' own "Bakhtinian" reading of the lost girl (1920). The author argues that a Bakhtinian poetics has so far had only a limited purchase on Lawrence because it has been from the start fixated on trying to assess whether any of Lawrence's novels are truly "polyphonic," an approach which always comes down to the question of the relationship between the author and his characters. "Polyphony" is itself problematic within Bakhtinian poetics, and this paper asks what else Bakhtin has to contribute to our better understanding of Lawrence, even while there might not be a coherant body of theory that can simply and reliably be called upon. Lawrence critics have not only used Bakhtin in a limited way, but they have not questioned the coherance of the theory itself. Major claims have been made for the relevance of Bakhtin to Lawrence, and especially the Lawrence in the middle period, 1917-1921, when he became a comic writer. The biographical and historical formation of the humorous, and self-critical Lawrence of this period is partly the product of the new direction in Lawrence studies; but also partly the outcome of the new material available, especially in the letters and the Cambridge biographies, which characterizes a new author persona, and one which goes against the grain of that ponderous, humourless scourge of the modern world first put about by Norman Douglass and T.S. Eliot, and later promoted by Leavis, albeit for different motives. Critics now find themselves in the position of rereading this fiction, from this newer, belated perspective, as comedy, even while they acknowledge the continuing, underlying seriousness of Lawrence's writing. Coincidental with the turn towards comedy in Lawrence studies has been the attempt, since 1985, to theorize it through the work of Mikhail Bakhtin. But how successful has that been?
Type:
Article
Keywords:
the lost girl; Lawrence, D. H.; parody; dialogics; Bakhtin, M. (Mikhail); polyphony; comedy
ISSN:
0011-4936
Rights:
No publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/01/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/01/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurden, R. (Robert)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:50Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:50Z-
dc.date.issued2002-09-
dc.identifier.citationD H Lawrence Review; 30 (3): 25-42-
dc.identifier.issn0011-4936-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58508-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper the author addresses the issue of the place in Bakhtin in Lawrence studies, first with some general points about the Bakhtinian readings of Lawrence; second with some of the key concepts in Bakhtin's theory revisited; and third, with the authors' own "Bakhtinian" reading of the lost girl (1920). The author argues that a Bakhtinian poetics has so far had only a limited purchase on Lawrence because it has been from the start fixated on trying to assess whether any of Lawrence's novels are truly "polyphonic," an approach which always comes down to the question of the relationship between the author and his characters. "Polyphony" is itself problematic within Bakhtinian poetics, and this paper asks what else Bakhtin has to contribute to our better understanding of Lawrence, even while there might not be a coherant body of theory that can simply and reliably be called upon. Lawrence critics have not only used Bakhtin in a limited way, but they have not questioned the coherance of the theory itself. Major claims have been made for the relevance of Bakhtin to Lawrence, and especially the Lawrence in the middle period, 1917-1921, when he became a comic writer. The biographical and historical formation of the humorous, and self-critical Lawrence of this period is partly the product of the new direction in Lawrence studies; but also partly the outcome of the new material available, especially in the letters and the Cambridge biographies, which characterizes a new author persona, and one which goes against the grain of that ponderous, humourless scourge of the modern world first put about by Norman Douglass and T.S. Eliot, and later promoted by Leavis, albeit for different motives. Critics now find themselves in the position of rereading this fiction, from this newer, belated perspective, as comedy, even while they acknowledge the continuing, underlying seriousness of Lawrence's writing. Coincidental with the turn towards comedy in Lawrence studies has been the attempt, since 1985, to theorize it through the work of Mikhail Bakhtin. But how successful has that been?-
dc.publisherD H Lawrence Review-
dc.rightsNo publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/01/2010]-
dc.subjectthe lost girl-
dc.subjectLawrence, D. H.-
dc.subjectparody-
dc.subjectdialogics-
dc.subjectBakhtin, M. (Mikhail)-
dc.subjectpolyphony-
dc.subjectcomedy-
dc.titleParody, stylization and dialogics: a Bakhtinian reading of the lost girl-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside-
dc.identifier.journalD H Lawrence Review-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/01/2010]-
or.citation.harvardBurden, R. J. (2002) 'Parody, stylization and dialogics: a Bakhtinian reading of the lost girl', D H Lawrence Review, 30 (3), pp.25-42.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.