Bohemians and 'pitmen painters' in North East England, 1930-1970

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58511
Title:
Bohemians and 'pitmen painters' in North East England, 1930-1970
Authors:
Vall, N. (Natasha)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Vall, N. (2004) 'Bohemians and 'pitmen painters' in North East England, 1930-1970', Visual Culture in Britain, 5 (1), pp.1-21.
Publisher:
Manchester University Press
Journal:
Visual Culture in Britain
Issue Date:
Jan-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58511
Abstract:
This article examines the representation of miner artists, such as Norman Cornish and Tom McGuinness, in the North East during the 1960s and before. The traditional view that interest in a mining aesthetic was largely an external construction, perpetuated through 'outside' intellectual patronage, from the 1930s 'bohemians' to the cultural pundits of the 1960s, and more recently through documentary photography, is considered. This article attempts to illustrate that an important regional dimension of the aesthetic construction of 'Northernness' emerged during the 1960s. North Eastern artists' and cultural critics' engagement with metropolitan aesthetic imperialism was crucial to the growing regional influence. Their response to outside patronage produced a cultural self-parody which played an important part in ensuring the tenacity of the 'Northern myth' during the 1960s and 1970s. On the other hand, national initiatives in cultural policy, such as the formation of regional arts councils, also contributed to the dissemination of a recognisably 'Northern' aesthetic to a wider audience after 1960.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
Cornish, Norman; McGuinness, Tom; north eastern art; northernness; mining
ISSN:
1471-4787
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/10/09]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 23/10/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVall, N. (Natasha)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:55Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:55Z-
dc.date.issued2004-01-
dc.identifier.citationVisual Culture in Britain;5(1): 1-21-
dc.identifier.issn1471-4787-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58511-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the representation of miner artists, such as Norman Cornish and Tom McGuinness, in the North East during the 1960s and before. The traditional view that interest in a mining aesthetic was largely an external construction, perpetuated through 'outside' intellectual patronage, from the 1930s 'bohemians' to the cultural pundits of the 1960s, and more recently through documentary photography, is considered. This article attempts to illustrate that an important regional dimension of the aesthetic construction of 'Northernness' emerged during the 1960s. North Eastern artists' and cultural critics' engagement with metropolitan aesthetic imperialism was crucial to the growing regional influence. Their response to outside patronage produced a cultural self-parody which played an important part in ensuring the tenacity of the 'Northern myth' during the 1960s and 1970s. On the other hand, national initiatives in cultural policy, such as the formation of regional arts councils, also contributed to the dissemination of a recognisably 'Northern' aesthetic to a wider audience after 1960.-
dc.publisherManchester University Press-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/10/09]-
dc.subjectCornish, Norman-
dc.subjectMcGuinness, Tom-
dc.subjectnorth eastern art-
dc.subjectnorthernness-
dc.subjectmining-
dc.titleBohemians and 'pitmen painters' in North East England, 1930-1970-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside-
dc.identifier.journalVisual Culture in Britain-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 23/10/2009]-
or.citation.harvardVall, N. (2004) 'Bohemians and 'pitmen painters' in North East England, 1930-1970', Visual Culture in Britain, 5 (1), pp.1-21.-
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