Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58514
Title:
Atoms in wonderland
Authors:
Forgan, S. (Sophie)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Arts and Media.
Citation:
Forgan, S. (2003) 'Atoms in wonderland', History and Technology, 19 (3), pp.177-196.
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
History and Technology
Issue Date:
Sep-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58514
DOI:
10.1080/0734151032000123936
Abstract:
This paper examines the representation of atomic science in Britain in museums, exhibitions, and print in the period 1945-1960. Due to postwar shortages, authors and publicists initially relied more on the written text than on visual representation. Underlying much writing was the idea of the “intelligent layman,” which formed a shorthand way of conceptualizing the non-specialist reading public, and accounts for much of the approach and tone of writing. The paper then examines the constraints of presenting atomic science in the Science Museum, London, and the 1951 Festival of Britain, as well as a range of publications for the wider market. These include the official publications of the UK Atomic Energy Authority, the enthusiastic output of the Institute of Atomic Information for the Layman, as well as works such as George Gamow's Mr. Tompkins in Wonderland. The use of images from Alice in Wonderland is examined as recurring motif for presenting an optimistic view of the benign potential of atomic science.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
atoms; popularization; museums; exhibitions; images
ISSN:
1477-2620
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 28/10/09]”
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 28/10/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorForgan, S. (Sophie)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:59Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:59Z-
dc.date.issued2003-09-
dc.identifier.citationHistory and Technology 19(3):177-196-
dc.identifier.issn1477-2620-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0734151032000123936-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58514-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the representation of atomic science in Britain in museums, exhibitions, and print in the period 1945-1960. Due to postwar shortages, authors and publicists initially relied more on the written text than on visual representation. Underlying much writing was the idea of the “intelligent layman,” which formed a shorthand way of conceptualizing the non-specialist reading public, and accounts for much of the approach and tone of writing. The paper then examines the constraints of presenting atomic science in the Science Museum, London, and the 1951 Festival of Britain, as well as a range of publications for the wider market. These include the official publications of the UK Atomic Energy Authority, the enthusiastic output of the Institute of Atomic Information for the Layman, as well as works such as George Gamow's Mr. Tompkins in Wonderland. The use of images from Alice in Wonderland is examined as recurring motif for presenting an optimistic view of the benign potential of atomic science.-
dc.publisherRoutledge-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 28/10/09]”-
dc.subjectatoms-
dc.subjectpopularization-
dc.subjectmuseums-
dc.subjectexhibitions-
dc.subjectimages-
dc.titleAtoms in wonderland-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Arts and Media.-
dc.identifier.journalHistory and Technology-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 28/10/2009]-
or.citation.harvardForgan, S. (2003) 'Atoms in wonderland', History and Technology, 19 (3), pp.177-196.-
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