The complex holiday calendar of 1902: responses to the coronation of Edward VII and the growth of Edwardian event fatigue

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621232
Title:
The complex holiday calendar of 1902: responses to the coronation of Edward VII and the growth of Edwardian event fatigue
Authors:
Roberts, B. (Ben)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Institute of Design Culture and the Arts
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Twentieth Century British History
Issue Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621232
Abstract:
The coronation of Edward VII and events to mark the end of the South African War led to a series of public ceremonies and events in the United Kingdom that had a profound effect on attitudes linked to national occasions and public holidays. This article explores the circumstances surrounding the numerous local and national holidays of 1902. It considers the decision-making process linked to the declaration of a coronation double-bank holiday, which demonstrated the inadequacy of contemporary legislation. The public response to the postponement of the coronation, due to the king’s contraction of appendicitis, led to a period of ‘event fatigue’ in response to further ceremonial events. This showcased how much the British people guarded their right to holiday time and how the coronation had become more synonymous with celebration than with royal ceremony. It also showcased the degree to which the British people had been politicized and were ready to defend what they saw as their rights, in rejection of deference and traditional authority.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Rights:
Subject to 2 year embargo, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0955-2359/ [Accessed: 19/06/2017]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, B. (Ben)en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T10:24:07Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-19T10:24:07Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/621232-
dc.description.abstractThe coronation of Edward VII and events to mark the end of the South African War led to a series of public ceremonies and events in the United Kingdom that had a profound effect on attitudes linked to national occasions and public holidays. This article explores the circumstances surrounding the numerous local and national holidays of 1902. It considers the decision-making process linked to the declaration of a coronation double-bank holiday, which demonstrated the inadequacy of contemporary legislation. The public response to the postponement of the coronation, due to the king’s contraction of appendicitis, led to a period of ‘event fatigue’ in response to further ceremonial events. This showcased how much the British people guarded their right to holiday time and how the coronation had become more synonymous with celebration than with royal ceremony. It also showcased the degree to which the British people had been politicized and were ready to defend what they saw as their rights, in rejection of deference and traditional authority.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.rightsSubject to 2 year embargo, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0955-2359/ [Accessed: 19/06/2017]en
dc.titleThe complex holiday calendar of 1902: responses to the coronation of Edward VII and the growth of Edwardian event fatigueen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Institute of Design Culture and the Artsen
dc.identifier.journalTwentieth Century British Historyen
dc.eprint.versionPost-print-
dc.embargo24 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2017-06-02-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.