The association between baseline persistent pain and weight change in patients attending a specialist weight management service

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621235
Title:
The association between baseline persistent pain and weight change in patients attending a specialist weight management service
Authors:
Ryan, C. G. (Cormac); Vijayaraman, A. (Arutchelvam); Denny, V. (Victoria); Ogier, A. (Alison); Ells, L. (Louisa); Wellburn, S. (Shaun); Cooper, L. (Lesley); Martin, D. J. (Denis); Atkinson, G. (Greg)
Affiliation:
Teesside University, Health and Social Care Institute
Citation:
Ryan CG, Vijayaraman A, Denny V, Ogier A, Ells L, Wellburn S, et al. (2017) The association between baseline persistent pain and weight change in patients attending a specialist weight management service. PLoS ONE; 12(6): e0179227.
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Issue Date:
12-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621235
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0179227
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179227
Abstract:
Objective To quantify the influence of baseline pain levels on weight change at one-year follow-up in patients attending a National Health Service specialist weight management programme. Methods We compared one-year follow-up weight (body mass) change between patient sub-groups of none-to-mild, moderate, and severe pain at baseline. A mean sub-group difference in weight change of ≥5kg was considered clinically relevant. Results Of the 141 complete cases, n = 43 (30.5%) reported none-to-mild pain, n = 44 (31.2%) reported moderate pain, and n = 54 (38.3%) reported severe pain. Covariate-adjusted mean weight loss (95%CI) was similar for those with none-to-mild (8.1kg (4.2 to 12.0kg)) and moderate pain (8.3kg (4.9 to 11.7kg). The mean weight loss of 3.0kg (-0.4 to 6.4kg) for the severe pain group was 5.1kg (-0.6 to 10.7, p = 0.08) lower than the none-to-mild pain group and 5.3kg (0.4 to 10.2kg, p = 0.03) lower than the moderate pain group. Conclusions Patients with severe pain upon entry to a specialist weight management service in England achieve a smaller mean weight loss at one-year follow-up than those with none-to-moderate pain. The magnitude of the difference in mean weight loss was clinically relevant, highlighting the importance of addressing severe persistent pain in obese patients undertaking weight management programmes.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Rights:
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, For further details see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ [accessed 19/6/17]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRyan, C. G. (Cormac)en
dc.contributor.authorVijayaraman, A. (Arutchelvam)en
dc.contributor.authorDenny, V. (Victoria)en
dc.contributor.authorOgier, A. (Alison)en
dc.contributor.authorElls, L. (Louisa)en
dc.contributor.authorWellburn, S. (Shaun)en
dc.contributor.authorCooper, L. (Lesley)en
dc.contributor.authorMartin, D. J. (Denis)en
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, G. (Greg)en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T14:44:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-19T14:44:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-12-
dc.identifier.citationPLOS ONE; 12 (6)en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0179227-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/621235-
dc.description.abstractObjective To quantify the influence of baseline pain levels on weight change at one-year follow-up in patients attending a National Health Service specialist weight management programme. Methods We compared one-year follow-up weight (body mass) change between patient sub-groups of none-to-mild, moderate, and severe pain at baseline. A mean sub-group difference in weight change of ≥5kg was considered clinically relevant. Results Of the 141 complete cases, n = 43 (30.5%) reported none-to-mild pain, n = 44 (31.2%) reported moderate pain, and n = 54 (38.3%) reported severe pain. Covariate-adjusted mean weight loss (95%CI) was similar for those with none-to-mild (8.1kg (4.2 to 12.0kg)) and moderate pain (8.3kg (4.9 to 11.7kg). The mean weight loss of 3.0kg (-0.4 to 6.4kg) for the severe pain group was 5.1kg (-0.6 to 10.7, p = 0.08) lower than the none-to-mild pain group and 5.3kg (0.4 to 10.2kg, p = 0.03) lower than the moderate pain group. Conclusions Patients with severe pain upon entry to a specialist weight management service in England achieve a smaller mean weight loss at one-year follow-up than those with none-to-moderate pain. The magnitude of the difference in mean weight loss was clinically relevant, highlighting the importance of addressing severe persistent pain in obese patients undertaking weight management programmes.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179227en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, For further details see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ [accessed 19/6/17]en
dc.titleThe association between baseline persistent pain and weight change in patients attending a specialist weight management service-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University, Health and Social Care Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
or.citation.harvardRyan CG, Vijayaraman A, Denny V, Ogier A, Ells L, Wellburn S, et al. (2017) The association between baseline persistent pain and weight change in patients attending a specialist weight management service. PLoS ONE; 12(6): e0179227.en
dc.eprint.versionPublished pdfen
dc.embargoNoneen
dc.date.accepted2017-05-26-
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