Prevalence and extent of enamel defects in the permanent teeth of 8-year-old Nigerian children

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621400
Title:
Prevalence and extent of enamel defects in the permanent teeth of 8-year-old Nigerian children
Authors:
Ibiyemi, O.; Zohoori, F. V. (Fatemeh Vida); Valentine, R. A.; Kometad, S.; Maguire, A. (Anne)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute
Citation:
Ibiyemi, O., Zohoori, F., Valentine, R., Kometad, S., Maguire, A. (2017) 'Prevalence and extent of enamel defects in the permanent teeth of 8-year-old Nigerian children' Community Dentistry Oral Epidemiology; Available online: 11 Sep 2017
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Community Dentistry Oral Epidemiology
Issue Date:
11-Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621400
DOI:
10.1111/cdoe.12328
Abstract:
Objectives: Enamel formation is a vulnerable developmental process, susceptible to environmental influences such as excessive systemic fluoride (F) exposure and infant/childhood disease. This study determined prevalence and extent of developmental enamel defects (DDE) and dental fluorosis in 8-year-old Nigerians and explored associations with key predictors. Methods: A sample of 322 healthy 8-year-olds (155 males, 167 females) from primary schools in lower and higher water F areas of; i) rural and ii) urban parts of Oyo State in south-west Nigeria (n=4 areas) (in which the mean (SD) F concentration of community water supplies ranged from 0.07 (0.02) – 2.13 (0.64) mg F/L), were dentally examined using modified DDE (mDDE) and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) indices. Drinking waters, cooking waters and toothpaste samples were analysed for F concentration using a F-Ion Selective Electrode (F-ISE). Information on infant/childhood diseases, infant feeding and tooth cleaning practices was obtained from parents/legal guardians. Data were analysed using ANOVA, Chi Square tests, Spearman correlation and binary logistic regression as appropriate. Results: Mean (SD) F concentration of actual drinking and actual cooking waters consumed by participants were 0.25 (0.20) and 0.24 (0.14) mg F/L respectively in the urban higher F area; 1.11 (1.00) and 1.16 (1.02) mg F/L respectively in the rural higher F area (p<0.05). Overall, mouth prevalence of DDE in the permanent dentition was 61.2% with a mean (SD) of 2.4 (2.2) index teeth affected. Dental fluorosis mouth prevalence was 29.8% with a mean of 2.1 (3.7) teeth affected. Prevalence and extent of DDE and dental fluorosis was greater in higher F than lower water F areas (p<0.001). A weak positive correlation was seen between extent of dental fluorosis and drinking water F concentration (ρ =0.28). The absence of infant/childhood disease was associated with a lower risk of DDE being present (p=0.001), with an Odds Ratio of 0.43 (95% CI=0.26, 0.71). Gender was a statistically significant (p=0.014) predictor for dental fluorosis with females having a higher risk (OR 1.94 (95% CI=1.14, 3.28) of dental fluorosis than males. Conclusions: In these Nigerian 8-year-olds (n=322), mouth prevalence of DDE was 61.2% (mean (SD) teeth affected = 2.4 (2.2)) and a key positive predictor was a history of infant/childhood disease. With 29.8% of these children exhibiting dental fluorosis (mean 3 (SD) teeth affected = 2.1(3.7)), drinking water F concentration was identified as a positive predictor, along with gender, with females more at risk of dental fluorosis than males.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
developmental defects of enamel; dental fluorosis; permanent teeth; prevalence; extent; children; dental caries; Nigeria
ISSN:
0301-5661
EISSN:
1600-0528
Rights:
Following a 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0301-5661/ [Accessed: 07/09/2017]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIbiyemi, O.en
dc.contributor.authorZohoori, F. V. (Fatemeh Vida)en
dc.contributor.authorValentine, R. A.en
dc.contributor.authorKometad, S.en
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, A. (Anne)en
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-07T15:54:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-07T15:54:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-11-
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry Oral Epidemiology; Available online: 11 Sep 2017en
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cdoe.12328-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/621400-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Enamel formation is a vulnerable developmental process, susceptible to environmental influences such as excessive systemic fluoride (F) exposure and infant/childhood disease. This study determined prevalence and extent of developmental enamel defects (DDE) and dental fluorosis in 8-year-old Nigerians and explored associations with key predictors. Methods: A sample of 322 healthy 8-year-olds (155 males, 167 females) from primary schools in lower and higher water F areas of; i) rural and ii) urban parts of Oyo State in south-west Nigeria (n=4 areas) (in which the mean (SD) F concentration of community water supplies ranged from 0.07 (0.02) – 2.13 (0.64) mg F/L), were dentally examined using modified DDE (mDDE) and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) indices. Drinking waters, cooking waters and toothpaste samples were analysed for F concentration using a F-Ion Selective Electrode (F-ISE). Information on infant/childhood diseases, infant feeding and tooth cleaning practices was obtained from parents/legal guardians. Data were analysed using ANOVA, Chi Square tests, Spearman correlation and binary logistic regression as appropriate. Results: Mean (SD) F concentration of actual drinking and actual cooking waters consumed by participants were 0.25 (0.20) and 0.24 (0.14) mg F/L respectively in the urban higher F area; 1.11 (1.00) and 1.16 (1.02) mg F/L respectively in the rural higher F area (p<0.05). Overall, mouth prevalence of DDE in the permanent dentition was 61.2% with a mean (SD) of 2.4 (2.2) index teeth affected. Dental fluorosis mouth prevalence was 29.8% with a mean of 2.1 (3.7) teeth affected. Prevalence and extent of DDE and dental fluorosis was greater in higher F than lower water F areas (p<0.001). A weak positive correlation was seen between extent of dental fluorosis and drinking water F concentration (ρ =0.28). The absence of infant/childhood disease was associated with a lower risk of DDE being present (p=0.001), with an Odds Ratio of 0.43 (95% CI=0.26, 0.71). Gender was a statistically significant (p=0.014) predictor for dental fluorosis with females having a higher risk (OR 1.94 (95% CI=1.14, 3.28) of dental fluorosis than males. Conclusions: In these Nigerian 8-year-olds (n=322), mouth prevalence of DDE was 61.2% (mean (SD) teeth affected = 2.4 (2.2)) and a key positive predictor was a history of infant/childhood disease. With 29.8% of these children exhibiting dental fluorosis (mean 3 (SD) teeth affected = 2.1(3.7)), drinking water F concentration was identified as a positive predictor, along with gender, with females more at risk of dental fluorosis than males.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rightsFollowing a 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0301-5661/ [Accessed: 07/09/2017]en
dc.subjectdevelopmental defects of enamelen
dc.subjectdental fluorosisen
dc.subjectpermanent teethen
dc.subjectprevalenceen
dc.subjectextenten
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectdental cariesen
dc.subjectNigeriaen
dc.titlePrevalence and extent of enamel defects in the permanent teeth of 8-year-old Nigerian childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0528-
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalCommunity Dentistry Oral Epidemiologyen
or.citation.harvardIbiyemi, O., Zohoori, F., Valentine, R., Kometad, S., Maguire, A. (2017) 'Prevalence and extent of enamel defects in the permanent teeth of 8-year-old Nigerian children' Community Dentistry Oral Epidemiology; Available online: 11 Sep 2017-
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2017-07-16-
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