On the use of thermal inertia in building stock to leverage decentralised demand side frequency regulation services

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621564
Title:
On the use of thermal inertia in building stock to leverage decentralised demand side frequency regulation services
Authors:
Williams, S. (Sean); Short, M. (Michael) ( 0000-0001-6290-4396 ) ; Crosbie, T. (Tracey)
Affiliation:
Teesside University School of Science Engineering and Design
Citation:
Williams, S., Short, M., Crosbie, T. (2018) 'On the use of thermal inertia in building stock to leverage decentralised demand side frequency regulation services', Applied Thermal Engineering; Online first 11 Jan 2018 : DOI: 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.01.035
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Applied Thermal Engineering
Issue Date:
11-Jan-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621564
Abstract:
Most governments are applying financial instruments and other polices to encourage distributed renewable electricity generation (DREG). DREG is less predictable and more volatile than traditional forms of energy generation. Closure of larger fossil-fuelled power plants and rising share of DREG is reducing system inertia on energy networks such that new methods of demand response are required. Usually participation in non-dynamic frequency response is reactive, affecting the duty cycle of thermostatically controlled loads. However, this can adversely affect building thermal efficiency. The research presented takes a proactive approach to demand response employing heat transfer dynamics. Here, thermal dynamics exhibit a significantly larger inertia than electrical power consumption. Thus, short-term fluctuations in energy use should have less effect on temperature regulation and user comfort in buildings than existing balancing services. A prototype frequency sensor and control unit for proactive demand response in building stock is developed. The paper reports on hardware-in-the-loop simulations, testing real thermal loads within a simulated power network. The instrumented approach adopted enables accurate real-time electrical frequency measurement, while the control method offers effective demand response, which suggest the feasibility of using decentralised frequency control regulation as a novel approach to existing demand response mechanisms.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Frequency regulation; decentralised control; demand response
ISSN:
1359-4311
Rights:
Following a 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1359-4311/ [Accessed: 16/03/2018]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, S. (Sean)en
dc.contributor.authorShort, M. (Michael)en
dc.contributor.authorCrosbie, T. (Tracey)en
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-12T15:18:28Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-12T15:18:28Z-
dc.date.issued2018-01-11-
dc.identifier.citationApplied Thermal Engineering; Online first 11 Jan 2018-
dc.identifier.issn1359-4311-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/621564-
dc.description.abstractMost governments are applying financial instruments and other polices to encourage distributed renewable electricity generation (DREG). DREG is less predictable and more volatile than traditional forms of energy generation. Closure of larger fossil-fuelled power plants and rising share of DREG is reducing system inertia on energy networks such that new methods of demand response are required. Usually participation in non-dynamic frequency response is reactive, affecting the duty cycle of thermostatically controlled loads. However, this can adversely affect building thermal efficiency. The research presented takes a proactive approach to demand response employing heat transfer dynamics. Here, thermal dynamics exhibit a significantly larger inertia than electrical power consumption. Thus, short-term fluctuations in energy use should have less effect on temperature regulation and user comfort in buildings than existing balancing services. A prototype frequency sensor and control unit for proactive demand response in building stock is developed. The paper reports on hardware-in-the-loop simulations, testing real thermal loads within a simulated power network. The instrumented approach adopted enables accurate real-time electrical frequency measurement, while the control method offers effective demand response, which suggest the feasibility of using decentralised frequency control regulation as a novel approach to existing demand response mechanisms.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsFollowing a 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1359-4311/ [Accessed: 16/03/2018]en
dc.subjectFrequency regulationen
dc.subjectdecentralised controlen
dc.subjectdemand responseen
dc.titleOn the use of thermal inertia in building stock to leverage decentralised demand side frequency regulation servicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University School of Science Engineering and Designen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Thermal Engineeringen
or.citation.harvardWilliams, S., Short, M., Crosbie, T. (2018) 'On the use of thermal inertia in building stock to leverage decentralised demand side frequency regulation services', Applied Thermal Engineering; Online first 11 Jan 2018 : DOI: 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.01.035-
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2018-01-10-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.