Estimating the Minimal Important Difference for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621656
Title:
Estimating the Minimal Important Difference for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears
Authors:
Braun, C. (Cordula); Handoll, H. H. G. (Helen)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute
Citation:
Braun, C., Handoll, H. (2018) 'Estimating the Minimal Important Difference for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice; Online first 12 Feb 2018 : DOI: 10.1016/j.msksp.2018.02.003
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice
Issue Date:
12-Feb-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621656
DOI:
10.1016/j.msksp.2018.02.003
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2468781218300432
Abstract:
Background Knowledge about Minimal Important Differences (MIDs) is essential for the interpretation of continuous outcomes, especially patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the MID for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC: score 0 (best) to 2100 (worst disability)) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, ‘symptomatic PTTs’, undergoing conservative treatment with physiotherapy. Design A prospectively-designed anchor-based MID analysis using data from a prospective prognostic study with a three-month follow-up conducted within an outpatient care setting in Germany. Methods The MID was estimated using data from 64 adults with atraumatic symptomatic PTTs who underwent three months of conservative treatment with physiotherapy. The anchor was a seven-point Global Perceived Change (GPC) scale. Results Based on a definition of the MID being the threshold of “being (at least slightly) improved” with a probability nearest to 0.90 (i.e. 9 of 10 patients achieving the MID), the MID for the WORC was estimated as −300 for ‘improved’ shoulder-related disability in 9 out of 10 patients (95% CI 8 out of 10 patients to everyone) undergoing three months of exercise-based physiotherapy for symptomatic PTTs. Conclusions This is the first published MID estimate for the WORC in adults with symptomatic PTTs of the rotator cuff undergoing typical treatment comprising conservative treatment with physiotherapy. The conceptual framework for interpretation facilitates its use in similar clinical contexts.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Shoulder pain; Physical therapy modalities; Patient reported outcome measures; Minimal clinically important difference
ISSN:
2468-7812
Rights:
Following a 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/2468-8630/ [Accessed: 13/02/2018]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBraun, C. (Cordula)en
dc.contributor.authorHandoll, H. H. G. (Helen)en
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-13T16:55:30Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-13T16:55:30Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-12-
dc.identifier.citationMusculoskeletal Science and Practice; Online first 12 Feb 2018en
dc.identifier.issn2468-7812-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.msksp.2018.02.003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/621656-
dc.description.abstractBackground Knowledge about Minimal Important Differences (MIDs) is essential for the interpretation of continuous outcomes, especially patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the MID for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC: score 0 (best) to 2100 (worst disability)) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, ‘symptomatic PTTs’, undergoing conservative treatment with physiotherapy. Design A prospectively-designed anchor-based MID analysis using data from a prospective prognostic study with a three-month follow-up conducted within an outpatient care setting in Germany. Methods The MID was estimated using data from 64 adults with atraumatic symptomatic PTTs who underwent three months of conservative treatment with physiotherapy. The anchor was a seven-point Global Perceived Change (GPC) scale. Results Based on a definition of the MID being the threshold of “being (at least slightly) improved” with a probability nearest to 0.90 (i.e. 9 of 10 patients achieving the MID), the MID for the WORC was estimated as −300 for ‘improved’ shoulder-related disability in 9 out of 10 patients (95% CI 8 out of 10 patients to everyone) undergoing three months of exercise-based physiotherapy for symptomatic PTTs. Conclusions This is the first published MID estimate for the WORC in adults with symptomatic PTTs of the rotator cuff undergoing typical treatment comprising conservative treatment with physiotherapy. The conceptual framework for interpretation facilitates its use in similar clinical contexts.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2468781218300432en
dc.rightsFollowing a 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/2468-8630/ [Accessed: 13/02/2018]en
dc.subjectShoulder painen
dc.subjectPhysical therapy modalitiesen
dc.subjectPatient reported outcome measuresen
dc.subjectMinimal clinically important differenceen
dc.titleEstimating the Minimal Important Difference for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tearsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalMusculoskeletal Science and Practiceen
or.citation.harvardBraun, C., Handoll, H. (2018) 'Estimating the Minimal Important Difference for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) in adults with shoulder pain associated with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice; Online first 12 Feb 2018 : DOI: 10.1016/j.msksp.2018.02.003-
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2018-02-09-
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