Accuracy and dispersal of subacromial and glenohumeral injections in cadavers

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/85254
Title:
Accuracy and dispersal of subacromial and glenohumeral injections in cadavers
Authors:
Hanchard, N. C. A. (Nigel); Shanahan, D. (Donald); Howe, T. E. (Tracey); Thompson, J. (Jonathan); Goodchild, L. M. (Lorna)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. The James Cook University Hospital. Teesside Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences; University of Newcastle. School of Medical Education Development. Department of Anatomy and Clinical Skills; Glasgow Caledonian University. HealthQWest; York District Hospital. Physiotherapy Department; James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough. Physiotherapy Department.
Citation:
Hanchard, N. et al. (2006) 'Accuracy and dispersal of subacromial and glenohumeral injections in cadavers', Journal of Rheumatology, 33 (6), pp.1143-6.
Publisher:
Journal of Rheumatology
Journal:
Journal of Rheumatology
Issue Date:
Jun-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/85254
PubMed ID:
16755663
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: "Blind" shoulder injections are often inaccurate and infiltrate untargeted structures. We tested a hypothesis that optimizing certain anatomical and positional factors would improve accuracy and reduce dispersal. METHODS: We evaluated one subacromial and one glenohumeral injection technique on cadavers. RESULTS: Mean accuracy was 91% for subacromial-targeted and 74 and 91% (worst- and best-case scenarios) for joint-targeted injections. Mean dispersal was 19% for subacromial-targeted and 16% for joint-targeted injections. All results bettered those reported previously. CONCLUSION: These "optimized" techniques might improve accuracy and limit dispersal of blind shoulder injections in clinical situations, benefiting efficacy and safety. However, evaluation is required in a clinical setting.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
acromioclavicular joint; aged; aged, 80 and over; arthrography; coloring agents; humans; humerus; injections, intra-articular; male; reproducibility of results; shoulder joint
ISSN:
0315-162X
Rights:
Only if funding agency rules apply, may an author deposit in institutional repositories for public release 12 months after first online publication. Otherwise author cannot archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) or post-print. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 3/11/2009]
Citation Count:
6 [Scopus, 3/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHanchard, N. C. A. (Nigel)en
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, D. (Donald)en
dc.contributor.authorHowe, T. E. (Tracey)en
dc.contributor.authorThompson, J. (Jonathan)en
dc.contributor.authorGoodchild, L. M. (Lorna)en
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-03T14:04:48Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-03T14:04:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006-06-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Rheumatology; 33 (6):1143-6.en
dc.identifier.issn0315-162X-
dc.identifier.pmid16755663-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/85254-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: "Blind" shoulder injections are often inaccurate and infiltrate untargeted structures. We tested a hypothesis that optimizing certain anatomical and positional factors would improve accuracy and reduce dispersal. METHODS: We evaluated one subacromial and one glenohumeral injection technique on cadavers. RESULTS: Mean accuracy was 91% for subacromial-targeted and 74 and 91% (worst- and best-case scenarios) for joint-targeted injections. Mean dispersal was 19% for subacromial-targeted and 16% for joint-targeted injections. All results bettered those reported previously. CONCLUSION: These "optimized" techniques might improve accuracy and limit dispersal of blind shoulder injections in clinical situations, benefiting efficacy and safety. However, evaluation is required in a clinical setting.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJournal of Rheumatologyen
dc.rightsOnly if funding agency rules apply, may an author deposit in institutional repositories for public release 12 months after first online publication. Otherwise author cannot archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) or post-print. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 3/11/2009]en
dc.subjectacromioclavicular jointen
dc.subjectageden
dc.subjectaged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectarthrographyen
dc.subjectcoloring agentsen
dc.subjecthumansen
dc.subjecthumerusen
dc.subjectinjections, intra-articularen
dc.subjectmaleen
dc.subjectreproducibility of resultsen
dc.subjectshoulder jointen
dc.titleAccuracy and dispersal of subacromial and glenohumeral injections in cadaversen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. The James Cook University Hospital. Teesside Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences; University of Newcastle. School of Medical Education Development. Department of Anatomy and Clinical Skills; Glasgow Caledonian University. HealthQWest; York District Hospital. Physiotherapy Department; James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough. Physiotherapy Department.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Rheumatologyen
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount6 [Scopus, 3/11/2009]en
or.citation.harvardHanchard, N. et al. (2006) 'Accuracy and dispersal of subacromial and glenohumeral injections in cadavers', Journal of Rheumatology, 33 (6), pp.1143-6.-

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