Queer beauty: illness, illegitimacy and visibility in Dickens's Bleak House and its 2005 BBC adaptation

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/90875
Title:
Queer beauty: illness, illegitimacy and visibility in Dickens's Bleak House and its 2005 BBC adaptation
Authors:
Carroll, R. (Rachel)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Arts and Media.
Citation:
Carroll, R. (2009) 'Queer beauty: illness, illegitimacy and visibility in Dickens's Bleak House and its 2005 BBC adaptation', Journal of Adaptation in Film & Performance, 2 (1), pp. 5-18.
Publisher:
Intellect
Journal:
Journal of Adaptation in Film & Performance
Issue Date:
May-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/90875
DOI:
10.1386/jafp.2.1.5_1
Abstract:
The visual plays a prominent role in the narrative of Charles Dickens's 1853 novel Bleak House; more specifically, a complex relationship between the visual and knowledge is integral to the identity intrigues at the core of Bleak House. This article will explore the relationship between the ‘visual economies’ (Robyn Wiegman) of Dickens's novel and its 2005 BBC adaptation. More specifically, it will focus on the relationship between illness, illegitimacy and the visible; it will suggest that the visible signs of Esther's illness, as inscribed on her face, can be read as signifying an invisible condition: illegitimacy. This article will explore the ways in which this adaptation, as a neo-Victorian television drama, lends renewed visibility to issues of gender, power and legitimacy at work in Dickens's novel.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
adaptation; television; neo-Victorian; illegitimacy; Dickens, Charles; Bleak House
ISSN:
17536421
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http:/www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 29/1/2010]
Citation Count:
No citation information available on Web of Science or Scopus [29/1/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, R. (Rachel)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-29T12:03:18Zen
dc.date.available2010-01-29T12:03:18Zen
dc.date.issued2009-05en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Adaptation in Film & Performance; 2 (1):5-18en
dc.identifier.issn17536421en
dc.identifier.doi10.1386/jafp.2.1.5_1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/90875en
dc.description.abstractThe visual plays a prominent role in the narrative of Charles Dickens's 1853 novel Bleak House; more specifically, a complex relationship between the visual and knowledge is integral to the identity intrigues at the core of Bleak House. This article will explore the relationship between the ‘visual economies’ (Robyn Wiegman) of Dickens's novel and its 2005 BBC adaptation. More specifically, it will focus on the relationship between illness, illegitimacy and the visible; it will suggest that the visible signs of Esther's illness, as inscribed on her face, can be read as signifying an invisible condition: illegitimacy. This article will explore the ways in which this adaptation, as a neo-Victorian television drama, lends renewed visibility to issues of gender, power and legitimacy at work in Dickens's novel.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIntellecten
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http:/www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 29/1/2010]en
dc.subjectadaptationen
dc.subjecttelevisionen
dc.subjectneo-Victorianen
dc.subjectillegitimacyen
dc.subjectDickens, Charlesen
dc.subjectBleak Houseen
dc.titleQueer beauty: illness, illegitimacy and visibility in Dickens's Bleak House and its 2005 BBC adaptationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Arts and Media.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Adaptation in Film & Performanceen
ref.citationcountNo citation information available on Web of Science or Scopus [29/1/2010]en
or.citation.harvardCarroll, R. (2009) 'Queer beauty: illness, illegitimacy and visibility in Dickens's Bleak House and its 2005 BBC adaptation', Journal of Adaptation in Film & Performance, 2 (1), pp. 5-18.en
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