Evaluation of static and dynamic postural stability in established rheumatoid arthritis: Exploratory study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/91975
Title:
Evaluation of static and dynamic postural stability in established rheumatoid arthritis: Exploratory study
Authors:
Rome, K. (Keith); Dixon, J. (John); Gray, M.; Woodley, R.
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences.
Citation:
Rome, K. et al. (2009) 'Evaluation of static and dynamic postural stability in established rheumatoid arthritis: Exploratory study', Clinical Biomechanics, 24 (6), pp.524-526.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Clinical Biomechanics
Issue Date:
Jul-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/91975
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2009.03.005
Abstract:
Background: It has been proposed that people with rheumatoid arthritis experience difficulties in postural control and activities of daily living such as walking. The aim of the study is to evaluate postural stability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Method: A convenience sample of 19 rheumatoid arthritis patients (mean duration 13.1 ± 9.2 years) were aged matched with a non-rheumatoid group (n = 21). Postural stability was measured using a force plate for anterior–posterior and mediolateral centre of pressure excursion for 30 s with eyes closed and open. Patients also performed three walks at a self-selected speed and mean temporal–spatial parameters were recorded. Findings: Significant differences were observed between the groups in anterior–posterior centre of pressure excursion during the eyes open task and the eyes closed task (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the mediolateral centre of pressure excursion during either condition (P > 0.05). The rheumatoid group displayed a significantly slower mean walking velocity, double support, cadence and cycle time than the non-rheumatoid group (P < 0.05). Interpretation: The results from this study showed that rheumatoid arthritis patients displayed a significantly larger centre of pressure excursion in the anterior–posterior direction during quiet standing, when compared to a non-rheumatoid arthritis control group suggesting that postural control mechanisms such as ankle strategies are impeded by the rheumatoid process.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
rheumatoid arthritis; gait; centre of pressure excursion; postural stability; risk factors; falls
ISSN:
02680033
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 12/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRome, K. (Keith)en
dc.contributor.authorDixon, J. (John)en
dc.contributor.authorGray, M.en
dc.contributor.authorWoodley, R.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-12T12:31:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-12T12:31:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-07-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Biomechanics; 24 (6): 524-526en
dc.identifier.issn02680033-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2009.03.005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/91975-
dc.description.abstractBackground: It has been proposed that people with rheumatoid arthritis experience difficulties in postural control and activities of daily living such as walking. The aim of the study is to evaluate postural stability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Method: A convenience sample of 19 rheumatoid arthritis patients (mean duration 13.1 ± 9.2 years) were aged matched with a non-rheumatoid group (n = 21). Postural stability was measured using a force plate for anterior–posterior and mediolateral centre of pressure excursion for 30 s with eyes closed and open. Patients also performed three walks at a self-selected speed and mean temporal–spatial parameters were recorded. Findings: Significant differences were observed between the groups in anterior–posterior centre of pressure excursion during the eyes open task and the eyes closed task (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the mediolateral centre of pressure excursion during either condition (P > 0.05). The rheumatoid group displayed a significantly slower mean walking velocity, double support, cadence and cycle time than the non-rheumatoid group (P < 0.05). Interpretation: The results from this study showed that rheumatoid arthritis patients displayed a significantly larger centre of pressure excursion in the anterior–posterior direction during quiet standing, when compared to a non-rheumatoid arthritis control group suggesting that postural control mechanisms such as ankle strategies are impeded by the rheumatoid process.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/02/2010]en
dc.subjectrheumatoid arthritisen
dc.subjectgaiten
dc.subjectcentre of pressure excursionen
dc.subjectpostural stabilityen
dc.subjectrisk factorsen
dc.subjectfallsen
dc.titleEvaluation of static and dynamic postural stability in established rheumatoid arthritis: Exploratory studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care. Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical Biomechanicsen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 12/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardRome, K. et al. (2009) 'Evaluation of static and dynamic postural stability in established rheumatoid arthritis: Exploratory study', Clinical Biomechanics, 24 (6), pp.524-526.-
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