The effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/91981
Title:
The effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activity
Authors:
Hatton, A. L. (Anna); Dixon, J. (John); Martin, D. J. (Denis); Rome, K. (Keith)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences.
Citation:
Hatton, A. L. et al. (2009) 'The effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activity', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 19 (5), pp.957-964.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/91981
DOI:
10.1016/j.jelekin.2008.04.012
Abstract:
Textured insoles may enhance sensory input on the plantar surfaces of the feet, thereby influencing neuromuscular function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether textured surfaces alter postural stability and lower limb muscle activity during quiet bipedal standing balance with eyes open. Anterior–posterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) sway variables and the intensity of electromyographic (EMG) activity in eight dominant lower limb muscles were collected synchronously over 30s in 24 young adults under three randomised conditions: control surface (C), texture 1 (T1) and texture 2 (T2). Repeated measures ANOVA showed that the textured surfaces did not significantly affect AP or ML postural sway in comparison to the control condition (p>0.05). Neither did the textured surfaces significantly alter EMG activity in the lower limbs (p>0.05). Under the specific conditions of this study, texture did not affect either postural sway or lower limb muscle activity in static bipedal standing. The results of this study point to three areas of further work including the effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activity: (i) in young healthy adults under more vigorous dynamic balance tests, (ii) post-fatigue, and (iii) in older adults presenting age-related deterioration.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
surface; postural stability; lower limb; muscle activity; effect; electromyographic activity; EMG; texture; sensory input
ISSN:
1050-6411
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 12/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHatton, A. L. (Anna)en
dc.contributor.authorDixon, J. (John)en
dc.contributor.authorMartin, D. J. (Denis)en
dc.contributor.authorRome, K. (Keith)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-12T13:22:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-12T13:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiology; 19 (5): 957-964en
dc.identifier.issn1050-6411-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jelekin.2008.04.012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/91981-
dc.description.abstractTextured insoles may enhance sensory input on the plantar surfaces of the feet, thereby influencing neuromuscular function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether textured surfaces alter postural stability and lower limb muscle activity during quiet bipedal standing balance with eyes open. Anterior–posterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) sway variables and the intensity of electromyographic (EMG) activity in eight dominant lower limb muscles were collected synchronously over 30s in 24 young adults under three randomised conditions: control surface (C), texture 1 (T1) and texture 2 (T2). Repeated measures ANOVA showed that the textured surfaces did not significantly affect AP or ML postural sway in comparison to the control condition (p>0.05). Neither did the textured surfaces significantly alter EMG activity in the lower limbs (p>0.05). Under the specific conditions of this study, texture did not affect either postural sway or lower limb muscle activity in static bipedal standing. The results of this study point to three areas of further work including the effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activity: (i) in young healthy adults under more vigorous dynamic balance tests, (ii) post-fatigue, and (iii) in older adults presenting age-related deterioration.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/02/2010]en
dc.subjectsurfaceen
dc.subjectpostural stabilityen
dc.subjectlower limben
dc.subjectmuscle activityen
dc.subjecteffecten
dc.subjectelectromyographic activityen
dc.subjectEMGen
dc.subjecttexture-
dc.subjectsensory input-
dc.titleThe effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Centre for Rehabilitation Sciences.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiologyen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 12/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardHatton, A. L. et al. (2009) 'The effect of textured surfaces on postural stability and lower limb muscle activity', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 19 (5), pp.957-964.-
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