The role of Emotional Intelligence in the decision to persist with academic studies in HE

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/91982
Title:
The role of Emotional Intelligence in the decision to persist with academic studies in HE
Authors:
Qualter, P. (Pamela); Whiteley, H. (Helen); Morley, A. (Andy); Dudiak, H. (Helen)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Department of Psychology.
Citation:
Qualter, P. et al. (2009) 'The role of Emotional Intelligence in the decision to persist with academic studies in HE', Research in Post-Compulsory Education, 14 (3), pp.219-231.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Research in Post-Compulsory Education
Issue Date:
Sep-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/91982
DOI:
10.1080/13596740903139255
Abstract:
Failure to adapt to the demands of higher education (HE) is often cited as a cause of withdrawal from the course. Parker and others (Parker, J.D.A., L.J. Summerfeldt, M.J. Hogan, and S.A. Majeski. 2004. Emotional intelligence and academic success: Examining the transition from high school to university. Personality and Individual Differences 36: 163-72) considered the role of individual differences in Emotional Intelligence (EI) and demonstrated a link between EI, withdrawal/retention and measures of academic achievement. In this study we ask whether EI mediates withdrawal in a UK HE institution and whether an EI-based intervention might improve retention rates. Study 1 considers the effects of EI upon retention, revealing that students with higher levels of EI are more likely to progress to Year 2 of study. Study 2 evaluates an EI-based intervention programme, demonstrating that students who show an increase in EI are more likely to persist with their studies. These findings are discussed in the light of current theoretical work. The prospects for EI-based intervention programmes are also considered.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
retention; Emotional Intelligence; intervention; widening participation; academic acheivement; higher education
ISSN:
1359-6748; 1747-5112
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 12/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQualter, P. (Pamela)en
dc.contributor.authorWhiteley, H. (Helen)en
dc.contributor.authorMorley, A. (Andy)en
dc.contributor.authorDudiak, H. (Helen)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-12T13:53:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-12T13:53:39Z-
dc.date.issued2009-09-
dc.identifier.citationResearch in Post-Compulsory Education; 14 (3): 219-231en
dc.identifier.issn1359-6748-
dc.identifier.issn1747-5112-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13596740903139255-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/91982-
dc.description.abstractFailure to adapt to the demands of higher education (HE) is often cited as a cause of withdrawal from the course. Parker and others (Parker, J.D.A., L.J. Summerfeldt, M.J. Hogan, and S.A. Majeski. 2004. Emotional intelligence and academic success: Examining the transition from high school to university. Personality and Individual Differences 36: 163-72) considered the role of individual differences in Emotional Intelligence (EI) and demonstrated a link between EI, withdrawal/retention and measures of academic achievement. In this study we ask whether EI mediates withdrawal in a UK HE institution and whether an EI-based intervention might improve retention rates. Study 1 considers the effects of EI upon retention, revealing that students with higher levels of EI are more likely to progress to Year 2 of study. Study 2 evaluates an EI-based intervention programme, demonstrating that students who show an increase in EI are more likely to persist with their studies. These findings are discussed in the light of current theoretical work. The prospects for EI-based intervention programmes are also considered.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/02/2010]en
dc.subjectretentionen
dc.subjectEmotional Intelligenceen
dc.subjectinterventionen
dc.subjectwidening participationen
dc.subjectacademic acheivementen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.titleThe role of Emotional Intelligence in the decision to persist with academic studies in HEen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Department of Psychology.en
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Post-Compulsory Educationen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 12/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardQualter, P. et al. (2009) 'The role of Emotional Intelligence in the decision to persist with academic studies in HE', Research in Post-Compulsory Education, 14 (3), pp.219-231.-
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