When FAST is a FAFF: is FAST scanning useful in non-trauma patients?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92316
Title:
When FAST is a FAFF: is FAST scanning useful in non-trauma patients?
Authors:
Maitra, S. (Sohom); Jarman, R. D. (Robert); Halford, N. W. (Neil); Richards, S. P. (Simon)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Department of Medical Ultrasound.
Citation:
Maitra, S. et al. (2008) 'When FAST is a FAFF: is FAST scanning useful in non-trauma patients?', Ultrasound, 16 (3), pp.165-168.
Publisher:
Maney Publishing
Journal:
Ultrasound
Issue Date:
Aug-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92316
DOI:
10.1179/174313408X322750
Abstract:
Aim/Background: Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has evolved into a common point-of-care diagnostic investigation in UK Emergency Departments (ED). Its role in the management of blunt abdominal trauma is well recognised. The aim of this study was to determine if the FAST scan can play a role in the management of non-traumatic patients. Method: A literature review was performed with the emphasis on the use of FAST scanning in the non-trauma setting. Results: In the acutely ill, undifferentiated, septic or decompensated patient, a Focused Assessment for Free Fluid (FAFF) scan may be of benefit, as a goal-directed investigation, to search for free fluid as an indicator of underlying disease source. The presence of free fluid in the non traumatised peritoneum implies primary or secondary intra-abdominal pathology requiring urgent specialist review and management. A FAFF scan can also play a role in the management of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm, ectopic pregnancy and some thoracic conditions. Conclusion: There is mounting evidence to support the efficacy of using such focused ultrasound, with its 'rule-in' high specificity, for helping reduce the potential differential diagnoses, at an early stage, in critically ill patients. We advocate the use of the term FAFF and not FAST, when emergency ultrasound is applied to non-traumatic clinical cases. We advise its liberal use by accredited clinicians, as part of a structured approach to the assessment of the undifferentiated, unwell patient presenting to emergency departments - especially those in shock or critically ill.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
focused assessment with sonography for trauma; FAST; focused assessment for free fluid; FAFF; ectopic pregnancy; ascites; non-traumatic; bowel perforation; thoracic ultrasound; abdominal aortic aneurysm
ISSN:
1742-271X; 1743-1344
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 16/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus 16/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaitra, S. (Sohom)en
dc.contributor.authorJarman, R. D. (Robert)en
dc.contributor.authorHalford, N. W. (Neil)en
dc.contributor.authorRichards, S. P. (Simon)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-16T13:38:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-16T13:38:17Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound; 16 (3): 165-168en
dc.identifier.issn1742-271X-
dc.identifier.issn1743-1344-
dc.identifier.doi10.1179/174313408X322750-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/92316-
dc.description.abstractAim/Background: Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has evolved into a common point-of-care diagnostic investigation in UK Emergency Departments (ED). Its role in the management of blunt abdominal trauma is well recognised. The aim of this study was to determine if the FAST scan can play a role in the management of non-traumatic patients. Method: A literature review was performed with the emphasis on the use of FAST scanning in the non-trauma setting. Results: In the acutely ill, undifferentiated, septic or decompensated patient, a Focused Assessment for Free Fluid (FAFF) scan may be of benefit, as a goal-directed investigation, to search for free fluid as an indicator of underlying disease source. The presence of free fluid in the non traumatised peritoneum implies primary or secondary intra-abdominal pathology requiring urgent specialist review and management. A FAFF scan can also play a role in the management of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm, ectopic pregnancy and some thoracic conditions. Conclusion: There is mounting evidence to support the efficacy of using such focused ultrasound, with its 'rule-in' high specificity, for helping reduce the potential differential diagnoses, at an early stage, in critically ill patients. We advocate the use of the term FAFF and not FAST, when emergency ultrasound is applied to non-traumatic clinical cases. We advise its liberal use by accredited clinicians, as part of a structured approach to the assessment of the undifferentiated, unwell patient presenting to emergency departments - especially those in shock or critically ill.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManey Publishingen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 16/02/2010]en
dc.subjectfocused assessment with sonography for traumaen
dc.subjectFASTen
dc.subjectfocused assessment for free fluiden
dc.subjectFAFFen
dc.subjectectopic pregnancyen
dc.subjectascitesen
dc.subjectnon-traumaticen
dc.subjectbowel perforationen
dc.subjectthoracic ultrasounden
dc.subjectabdominal aortic aneurysmen
dc.titleWhen FAST is a FAFF: is FAST scanning useful in non-trauma patients?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Department of Medical Ultrasound.en
dc.identifier.journalUltrasounden
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus 16/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardMaitra, S. et al. (2008) 'When FAST is a FAFF: is FAST scanning useful in non-trauma patients?', Ultrasound, 16 (3), pp.165-168.-
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