Carrying a rucksack on either shoulder or the back, does it matter? Load induced functional scoliosis in "normal" young subjects

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92342
Title:
Carrying a rucksack on either shoulder or the back, does it matter? Load induced functional scoliosis in "normal" young subjects
Book Title:
Research into Spinal Deformities 6
Authors:
Bettany-Saltikov, J. A. (Josette); Warren, J. G. (Julian); Stamp, M.
Editors:
Dangerfield, P. H. (Peter)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; University of Teesside. School of Computing.
Citation:
Bettany-Saltikov, J., Warren, J. and Stamp, M. (2008) 'Carrying a rucksack on either shoulder or the back, does it matter? Load induced functional scoliosis in "normal" young subjects', 7th international research society of spinal deformities meeting, Liverpool, July 9 - 12 July, in Dangerfield, P. (ed) Research into Spinal Deformities 6, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Amsterdam: IOS Press, pp.221-224.
Publisher:
IOS Press
Conference:
7th international research society of spinal deformities meeting, IRSSD 2008, Liverpool, July 9 - 12 July 2008.
Issue Date:
Sep-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92342
DOI:
10.3233/978-1-58603-888-5-221
Abstract:
Approximately 40 million students in the United States and a similar number in Europe carry school rucksacks. The average student carries a rucksack weighing almost one fourth of his or her body weight. This has led to more than 7,000 A&E referrals each year related to carrying school bags in the US. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carrying a rucksack (on each shoulder or on both), on 3D spinal curvature in healthy young students. A convenience sample of 30 healthy young adults participated in this study. A Microscribe 3DX digitiser recorded the three dimensional coordinates of thirteen key anatomical landmarks along the spine in four different loading conditions; no rucksack (reference) carrying a rucksack (17% body weight) simultaneously on both shoulders and solely on the right or the left shoulder. The data obtained was analyzed using standard statistical methods. Carrying the load on both shoulders resulted in no difference in the frontal plane angle but significantly decreased the thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane. However, carrying the load on the right shoulder significantly increased the thoracic lateral curvature in the frontal plane and decreased the thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane. This study confirms that even carrying a 17% load causes significant changes in spinal alignment. It is essential that Health and Safety professionals promote the awareness and effects of diverse rucksack carriage modes and excessive rucksack weight to avoid the early onset of low back pain.
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings; Book Chapter
Language:
en
Keywords:
asymmetrical; loading; rucksack; symmetrical; shoulder; back; scoliosis; load induced; weight; carrying; heavy; young people
Series/Report no.:
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; 140
ISBN:
9781586038885
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 17/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBettany-Saltikov, J. A. (Josette)en
dc.contributor.authorWarren, J. G. (Julian)en
dc.contributor.authorStamp, M.en
dc.contributor.editorDangerfield, P. H. (Peter)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-17T11:42:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-17T11:42:29Z-
dc.date.issued2008-09-
dc.identifier.isbn9781586038885-
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/978-1-58603-888-5-221-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/92342-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 40 million students in the United States and a similar number in Europe carry school rucksacks. The average student carries a rucksack weighing almost one fourth of his or her body weight. This has led to more than 7,000 A&E referrals each year related to carrying school bags in the US. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carrying a rucksack (on each shoulder or on both), on 3D spinal curvature in healthy young students. A convenience sample of 30 healthy young adults participated in this study. A Microscribe 3DX digitiser recorded the three dimensional coordinates of thirteen key anatomical landmarks along the spine in four different loading conditions; no rucksack (reference) carrying a rucksack (17% body weight) simultaneously on both shoulders and solely on the right or the left shoulder. The data obtained was analyzed using standard statistical methods. Carrying the load on both shoulders resulted in no difference in the frontal plane angle but significantly decreased the thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane. However, carrying the load on the right shoulder significantly increased the thoracic lateral curvature in the frontal plane and decreased the thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane. This study confirms that even carrying a 17% load causes significant changes in spinal alignment. It is essential that Health and Safety professionals promote the awareness and effects of diverse rucksack carriage modes and excessive rucksack weight to avoid the early onset of low back pain.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOS Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStudies in Health Technology and Informaticsen
dc.relation.ispartofseries140en
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 17/02/2010]en
dc.subjectasymmetricalen
dc.subjectloadingen
dc.subjectrucksacken
dc.subjectsymmetricalen
dc.subjectshoulderen
dc.subjectbacken
dc.subjectscoliosisen
dc.subjectload induceden
dc.subjectweighten
dc.subjectcarryingen
dc.subjectheavyen
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.titleCarrying a rucksack on either shoulder or the back, does it matter? Load induced functional scoliosis in "normal" young subjectsen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care; University of Teesside. School of Computing.en
dc.title.bookResearch into Spinal Deformities 6en
dc.identifier.conference7th international research society of spinal deformities meeting, IRSSD 2008, Liverpool, July 9 - 12 July 2008.en
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 17/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardBettany-Saltikov, J., Warren, J. and Stamp, M. (2008) 'Carrying a rucksack on either shoulder or the back, does it matter? Load induced functional scoliosis in "normal" young subjects', 7th international research society of spinal deformities meeting, Liverpool, July 9 - 12 July, in Dangerfield, P. (ed) Research into Spinal Deformities 6, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Amsterdam: IOS Press, pp.221-224.-
prism.startingPage221-
prism.endingPage224-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.