Maximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water running

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92462
Title:
Maximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water running
Authors:
Azevedo, L. B. (Liane); Lambert, M. I. (Mike); Zogaib, P. S. (Paulo); Barros Neto, T. L. (Turibo)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Azevedo, L. B. et al (2010) 'Maximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water running', Journal of Sports Sciences, 28(4), pp.407-414.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date:
Feb-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92462
DOI:
10.1080/02640410903527813
Abstract:
The aim of the study was to compare physiological responses between runners adapted and not adapted to deep water running at maximal intensity and the intensity equivalent to the ventilatory threshold. Seventeen runners, either adapted (n = 10) or not adapted (n = 7) to deep water running, participated in the study. Participants in both groups undertook a maximal treadmill running and deep water running graded exercise test in which cardiorespiratory variables were measured. Interactions between adaptation (adapted vs. non-adapted) and condition (treadmill running vs. deep water running) were analysed. The main effects of adaptation and condition were also analysed in isolation. Runners adapted to deep water running experienced less of a reduction in maximum oxygen consumption ([Vdot]O2max) in deep water running compared with treadmill running than runners not adapted to deep water running. Maximal oxygen consumption, maximal heart rate, maximal ventilation, [Vdot]O2 at the ventilatory threshold, heart rate at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilation at the ventilatory threshold were significantly higher during treadmill than deep water running. Therefore, we conclude that adaptation to deep water running reduces the difference in [Vdot]O2max between the two modalities, possibly due to an increase in muscle recruitment. The results of this study support previous findings of a lower maximal and submaximal physiological response on deep water running for most of the measured parameters.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
oxygen consumption; heart rate; ventilation; lactate; muscle recruitment; deep water running; running; physiological responses
ISSN:
0264-0414; 1466-447X
Rights:
subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 18/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAzevedo, L. B. (Liane)en
dc.contributor.authorLambert, M. I. (Mike)en
dc.contributor.authorZogaib, P. S. (Paulo)en
dc.contributor.authorBarros Neto, T. L. (Turibo)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-18T11:18:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-18T11:18:57Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Sciences; 28(4):407-414en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414-
dc.identifier.issn1466-447X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640410903527813-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/92462-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to compare physiological responses between runners adapted and not adapted to deep water running at maximal intensity and the intensity equivalent to the ventilatory threshold. Seventeen runners, either adapted (n = 10) or not adapted (n = 7) to deep water running, participated in the study. Participants in both groups undertook a maximal treadmill running and deep water running graded exercise test in which cardiorespiratory variables were measured. Interactions between adaptation (adapted vs. non-adapted) and condition (treadmill running vs. deep water running) were analysed. The main effects of adaptation and condition were also analysed in isolation. Runners adapted to deep water running experienced less of a reduction in maximum oxygen consumption ([Vdot]O2max) in deep water running compared with treadmill running than runners not adapted to deep water running. Maximal oxygen consumption, maximal heart rate, maximal ventilation, [Vdot]O2 at the ventilatory threshold, heart rate at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilation at the ventilatory threshold were significantly higher during treadmill than deep water running. Therefore, we conclude that adaptation to deep water running reduces the difference in [Vdot]O2max between the two modalities, possibly due to an increase in muscle recruitment. The results of this study support previous findings of a lower maximal and submaximal physiological response on deep water running for most of the measured parameters.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.rightssubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 18/02/2010]en
dc.subjectoxygen consumptionen
dc.subjectheart rateen
dc.subjectventilationen
dc.subjectlactateen
dc.subjectmuscle recruitmenten
dc.subjectdeep water runningen
dc.subjectrunningen
dc.subjectphysiological responsesen
dc.titleMaximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water runningen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardAzevedo, L. B. et al (2010) 'Maximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water running', Journal of Sports Sciences, 28(4), pp.407-414.-
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