The Balkans as a ‘laboratory (for the study) of illegal markets’: Introduction to the special issue on ‘Illegal Markets in the Balkans’

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92554
Title:
The Balkans as a ‘laboratory (for the study) of illegal markets’: Introduction to the special issue on ‘Illegal Markets in the Balkans’
Authors:
Antonopoulos, G. A. (Georgios)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.
Citation:
Antonopoulos, G. A. (2008) 'The Balkans as a ‘laboratory (for the study) of illegal markets’: Introduction to the special issue on ‘Illegal Markets in the Balkans’', Trends in Organized Crime, 11 (4), pp.315-325.
Publisher:
Springer New York
Journal:
Trends in Organized Crime
Issue Date:
Dec-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92554
DOI:
10.1007/s12117-008-9051-z
Abstract:
It is impossible for one interested in ‘organised crime’ and illegal markets to ignore the area of the Balkans. Particularly since the beginning of the 1990s, when ‘organised crime’ replaced communismas the ‘threat’ against the western world, the Balkans began to be viewed as a source, transit and destination area for migrating ‘organised criminals’ and as an integral part of a global nexus of illicit markets. This is exemplified, for example, in the statement that “the Balkans have become the gateway to Europe for organised criminals… Criminal gangs are behind a multi-million pound business smuggling people, drugs and guns…”, issued at a 2002 London-held international conference focusing on the ‘threat of organised crime’ in the Balkans co-organised by the then British Home Secretary David Blunkett and Foreign Secretary Jack Straw. In addition, the Home Secretary stated in the conference that these Balkan criminal gangs are “more organised” than the police (BBC News 2002). However, compared to other contexts, there is relatively little known about illegal markets and ‘organised crime’ in the Balkans, despite the abundance of programmes, initiatives, and organisations existing in the area about and the generous funding invested on these issues.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
illegal markets; organised crime; Balkans
ISSN:
1084-4791; 1936-4830
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 19/02/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 19/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAntonopoulos, G. A. (Georgios)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-19T10:06:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-19T10:06:14Z-
dc.date.issued2008-12-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in Organized Crime; 11 (4): 315-325en
dc.identifier.issn1084-4791-
dc.identifier.issn1936-4830-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12117-008-9051-z-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/92554-
dc.description.abstractIt is impossible for one interested in ‘organised crime’ and illegal markets to ignore the area of the Balkans. Particularly since the beginning of the 1990s, when ‘organised crime’ replaced communismas the ‘threat’ against the western world, the Balkans began to be viewed as a source, transit and destination area for migrating ‘organised criminals’ and as an integral part of a global nexus of illicit markets. This is exemplified, for example, in the statement that “the Balkans have become the gateway to Europe for organised criminals… Criminal gangs are behind a multi-million pound business smuggling people, drugs and guns…”, issued at a 2002 London-held international conference focusing on the ‘threat of organised crime’ in the Balkans co-organised by the then British Home Secretary David Blunkett and Foreign Secretary Jack Straw. In addition, the Home Secretary stated in the conference that these Balkan criminal gangs are “more organised” than the police (BBC News 2002). However, compared to other contexts, there is relatively little known about illegal markets and ‘organised crime’ in the Balkans, despite the abundance of programmes, initiatives, and organisations existing in the area about and the generous funding invested on these issues.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer New Yorken
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 19/02/2010]en
dc.subjectillegal marketsen
dc.subjectorganised crimeen
dc.subjectBalkansen
dc.titleThe Balkans as a ‘laboratory (for the study) of illegal markets’: Introduction to the special issue on ‘Illegal Markets in the Balkans’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.en
dc.identifier.journalTrends in Organized Crimeen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 19/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardAntonopoulos, G. A. (2008) 'The Balkans as a ‘laboratory (for the study) of illegal markets’: Introduction to the special issue on ‘Illegal Markets in the Balkans’', Trends in Organized Crime, 11 (4), pp.315-325.-
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