A review of parental involvement in sex education: The role for effective communication in British families

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92791
Title:
A review of parental involvement in sex education: The role for effective communication in British families
Authors:
Turnbull, T. (Triece); van Schaik, P. (Paul) ( 0000-0001-5322-6554 ) ; van Wersch, A. (Anna)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.
Citation:
Turnbull, T., van Schaik, P. and van Wersch, A. (2008) 'A review of parental involvement in sex education: The role for effective communication in British families', Health Education Journal, 67 (3), pp.182-195.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Journal:
Health Education Journal
Issue Date:
Sep-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92791
DOI:
10.1177/0017896908094636
Abstract:
A review of recent literature (2000—2006) has been undertaken to investigate the role of sex education within the family context, in order to engage with the problems of sexual health in British society. The findings which emerged were categorized under the following five themes: (1) Parental roles regarding sex education; (2) The importance of effective communication in the family; (3) Parent—child interaction: differences in gender and communication style; (4) Content of sex education; and (5) Parents as primary sexual educators. The findings highlighted the importance of communication, and showed a tendency of children and adolescents wanting to learn about sexual matters from their parents. Studies on communication of sexual issues emphasized the role of gender, psychological factors and family dynamics in the effectiveness of sex education. Although the majority of communication on sexual subjects has been found to come from the mother, boys feel that the content is mainly steered towards the experience of girls. Consequently, boys use other sources (peers, the media and the Internet) to educate themselves about sexual related issues. Even though parents want to talk to their children about topics related to sexual behaviours, they feel embarrassed, uncomfortable and have neither the skills nor the knowledge to do so. A need for sex and relationship education (SRE) parent programmes has been identified to ensure that the information being taught at school can be reinforced in the family home. Thoughts for enhancing SRE within the family are presented.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
parental involvement; sex education; British families; sexual health problems; parental roles; communication; adolescents
ISSN:
0017-8969
Rights:
subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/02/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 23/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTurnbull, T. (Triece)en
dc.contributor.authorvan Schaik, P. (Paul)en
dc.contributor.authorvan Wersch, A. (Anna)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-23T15:09:59Zen
dc.date.available2010-02-23T15:09:59Zen
dc.date.issued2008-09en
dc.identifier.citationHealth Education Journal; 67 (3): 182-195en
dc.identifier.issn0017-8969en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0017896908094636en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/92791en
dc.description.abstractA review of recent literature (2000—2006) has been undertaken to investigate the role of sex education within the family context, in order to engage with the problems of sexual health in British society. The findings which emerged were categorized under the following five themes: (1) Parental roles regarding sex education; (2) The importance of effective communication in the family; (3) Parent—child interaction: differences in gender and communication style; (4) Content of sex education; and (5) Parents as primary sexual educators. The findings highlighted the importance of communication, and showed a tendency of children and adolescents wanting to learn about sexual matters from their parents. Studies on communication of sexual issues emphasized the role of gender, psychological factors and family dynamics in the effectiveness of sex education. Although the majority of communication on sexual subjects has been found to come from the mother, boys feel that the content is mainly steered towards the experience of girls. Consequently, boys use other sources (peers, the media and the Internet) to educate themselves about sexual related issues. Even though parents want to talk to their children about topics related to sexual behaviours, they feel embarrassed, uncomfortable and have neither the skills nor the knowledge to do so. A need for sex and relationship education (SRE) parent programmes has been identified to ensure that the information being taught at school can be reinforced in the family home. Thoughts for enhancing SRE within the family are presented.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen
dc.rightssubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/02/2010]en
dc.subjectparental involvementen
dc.subjectsex educationen
dc.subjectBritish familiesen
dc.subjectsexual health problemsen
dc.subjectparental rolesen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectadolescentsen
dc.titleA review of parental involvement in sex education: The role for effective communication in British familiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.en
dc.identifier.journalHealth Education Journalen
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 23/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardTurnbull, T., van Schaik, P. and van Wersch, A. (2008) 'A review of parental involvement in sex education: The role for effective communication in British families', Health Education Journal, 67 (3), pp.182-195.en
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