Language barriers in health and social care consultations in the community: A comparative study of responses in Ireland and England

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/95905
Title:
Language barriers in health and social care consultations in the community: A comparative study of responses in Ireland and England
Authors:
MacFarlane, A. (Anne); Singleton, C. (Carrie); Green, E. E. (Eileen)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.; Social Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.
Citation:
MacFarlane, A., Singleton, C. and Green, E. E. (2009) 'Language barriers in health and social care consultations in the community: A comparative study of responses in Ireland and England', Health Policy, 92 (2-3), pp.203-210'.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Health Policy
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/95905
DOI:
10.1016/j.healthpol.2009.03.014
Abstract:
Objective: This paper focuses on the implications of migration for host health and social care systems in terms of linguistic diversity, language barriers and language supports. The objective is to compare Ireland, as a context responding to the new challenge of language barriers in healthcare, and England, as a context in which the management of language barriers is being re-assessed. Methods: Empirical data from two action research studies in Ireland and England are compared. The combined data set is 146 data collection episodes with service users with limited English and their health and social care providers. Results: Key findings are that the same range of formal and informal responses to language barriers occurs in practice in both contexts but proportions of knowledge and use of these responses differ. English service providers have more awareness about the use of formal responses than Irish service providers but uptake of formal responses remains low in both contexts. Data from service users confirms these findings. Conclusions: There is a need for more attention to the implementation of policies for language barriers in both Ireland and England, further research about the normalization processes associated with these consultations and knowledge transfer networks to facilitate on-going dialogue between all key stakeholders with an emphasis on supporting service users' involvement and participation.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
action research; health and social care; health policy; language barriers; migration
ISSN:
0168-8510
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 07/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 07/06/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacFarlane, A. (Anne)en
dc.contributor.authorSingleton, C. (Carrie)en
dc.contributor.authorGreen, E. E. (Eileen)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-07T14:14:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-07T14:14:37Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationHealth Policy; 92 (2-3): 203-210en
dc.identifier.issn0168-8510-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.healthpol.2009.03.014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/95905-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This paper focuses on the implications of migration for host health and social care systems in terms of linguistic diversity, language barriers and language supports. The objective is to compare Ireland, as a context responding to the new challenge of language barriers in healthcare, and England, as a context in which the management of language barriers is being re-assessed. Methods: Empirical data from two action research studies in Ireland and England are compared. The combined data set is 146 data collection episodes with service users with limited English and their health and social care providers. Results: Key findings are that the same range of formal and informal responses to language barriers occurs in practice in both contexts but proportions of knowledge and use of these responses differ. English service providers have more awareness about the use of formal responses than Irish service providers but uptake of formal responses remains low in both contexts. Data from service users confirms these findings. Conclusions: There is a need for more attention to the implementation of policies for language barriers in both Ireland and England, further research about the normalization processes associated with these consultations and knowledge transfer networks to facilitate on-going dialogue between all key stakeholders with an emphasis on supporting service users' involvement and participation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 07/04/2010]en
dc.subjectaction researchen
dc.subjecthealth and social careen
dc.subjecthealth policyen
dc.subjectlanguage barriersen
dc.subjectmigrationen
dc.titleLanguage barriers in health and social care consultations in the community: A comparative study of responses in Ireland and Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.en
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.en
dc.identifier.journalHealth Policyen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 07/06/2010]en
or.citation.harvardMacFarlane, A., Singleton, C. and Green, E. E. (2009) 'Language barriers in health and social care consultations in the community: A comparative study of responses in Ireland and England', Health Policy, 92 (2-3), pp.203-210'.en
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