Youth culture, subculture and the importance of neighbourhood

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97175
Title:
Youth culture, subculture and the importance of neighbourhood
Authors:
Shildrick, T. A. (Tracy)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside.; Social Futures Institute. Youth Research Unit.
Citation:
Shildrick, T. A. (2006) 'Youth culture, subculture and the importance of neighbourhood', Young, 14 (1), pp.61-74.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Journal:
Young
Issue Date:
Feb-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97175
DOI:
10.1177/1103308806059815
Abstract:
Investigations into youth culture are marginal to the field of youth studies. The Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) at the University of Birmingham published studies of the post-war youth subcultures, such as the teddy boys and the punks, in the late 1970s and early 1980s (see Hall and Jefferson, 1976). From the 1980s onwards, however, the main concerns for youth studies were the transitions that young people made into the labour market.Transitions research continues to dominate, although the advent of the rave and dance cultures of the late 1980s prompted a partial return to investigations of youth culture. In direct contrast to the influential theories of the CCCS, many recent accounts of youth culture have moved away from structural and class-based accounts of young people’s experiences and have produced studies that stress the ‘tribal’ (Bennett, 1999, 2000), ‘individualized’ (Miles, 2000) and distinctly ‘postsubcultural’ (Muggleton, 2000) nature of the contemporary youth cultural experience. Recently, however, questions have been raised as to how far these theoretical insights are useful across youth cultural identities and experiences (Hollands, 2002; Nayak, 2003; Pilkington and Johnson, 2003). This article adds to this slowly growing literature. By drawing upon data collected for a PhD, it is suggested that structural factors, such as neighbourhood residence, can be influential in shaping the cultural identities and experiences of some groups of young people.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
neighbourhood; subculture; youth culture; cultural identities; experiences; young people
ISSN:
1103-3088
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShildrick, T. A. (Tracy)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-22T15:42:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-22T15:42:49Z-
dc.date.issued2006-02-
dc.identifier.citationYoung; 14 (1): 61-74en
dc.identifier.issn1103-3088-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1103308806059815-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/97175-
dc.description.abstractInvestigations into youth culture are marginal to the field of youth studies. The Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) at the University of Birmingham published studies of the post-war youth subcultures, such as the teddy boys and the punks, in the late 1970s and early 1980s (see Hall and Jefferson, 1976). From the 1980s onwards, however, the main concerns for youth studies were the transitions that young people made into the labour market.Transitions research continues to dominate, although the advent of the rave and dance cultures of the late 1980s prompted a partial return to investigations of youth culture. In direct contrast to the influential theories of the CCCS, many recent accounts of youth culture have moved away from structural and class-based accounts of young people’s experiences and have produced studies that stress the ‘tribal’ (Bennett, 1999, 2000), ‘individualized’ (Miles, 2000) and distinctly ‘postsubcultural’ (Muggleton, 2000) nature of the contemporary youth cultural experience. Recently, however, questions have been raised as to how far these theoretical insights are useful across youth cultural identities and experiences (Hollands, 2002; Nayak, 2003; Pilkington and Johnson, 2003). This article adds to this slowly growing literature. By drawing upon data collected for a PhD, it is suggested that structural factors, such as neighbourhood residence, can be influential in shaping the cultural identities and experiences of some groups of young people.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/04/2010]en
dc.subjectneighbourhooden
dc.subjectsubcultureen
dc.subjectyouth cultureen
dc.subjectcultural identitiesen
dc.subjectexperiencesen
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.titleYouth culture, subculture and the importance of neighbourhooden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside.en
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Youth Research Unit.-
dc.identifier.journalYoungen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardShildrick, T. A. (2006) 'Youth culture, subculture and the importance of neighbourhood', Young, 14 (1), pp.61-74.-
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